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Scott Brown's Senate win tied to dissatisfaction with Obama, Washington and federal activism

January 22, 2010 |  3:32 pm

MassWelcomesYouSign

Under the polling category Keen Grasp of the Obvious Outside of Washington, a new coalition poll out of Massachusetts this afternoon says voters are unhappy with both Democrat President Obama's federal government activism and maybe-dying-but-don't-count-on-it healthcare legislation that has consumed so much of his attention lo these many months of double-digit unemployment.

That's why in Tuesday's special election against Obama-backer state Atty. Gen. Martha Coakley, Bay State voters opted instead for this handsome, longtime Republican nobody, Scott Brown, after decades of planting Democrat derrieres in that U.S. Senate seat.

Anyone who's talked to a neighbor or read anything online recently beyond the White House website (See related items below) knows how worried, frightened and angry many Americans are these days now that holiday bills are already arriving along with Obama campaign pleas for more money.

Many who were tired of and angry at you-know-who-from-Texas had thought that by turning the entire federal government -- Senate, White House and the other House -- over to Democrats in....

...November of 2008, the liberal crowd would get something done with its whopping majorities. More than 80% of Massachusetts voters back then felt the U.S. was off-track.

This new -- or perhaps continuing -- anger is building despite the Obama-Biden team's best efforts to talk the concerns down by vehemently nodding and saying they're really, unbelievably angry too. So?

Still, it's always helpful for the never-ending D.C. debates to have statistical confirmation that Scott Brown's arrival in the Northeast haNew Republican Senator Scott Brown on election night 1-19-10s no connection with the biblical rains arriving in the American Southwest.

In related news, a new Rasmussen Reports Poll finds 61% of Americans think it's time for Congress to get off the healthcare issue thing and delve deeper into fixing the economy.

And a new Gallup Poll finds similar numbers also support moving on.

Turns out now, the hopelessly minority Republicans in Washington may have benefited by being helplessly on the sidelines for the first quarter of the Obama administration with next November's midterm elections approaching and change to believe in on the GOP side this time.

Here's what the story is:

"The poll by The Washington Post, the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation and Harvard University's School of Public Health underscores how significantly voter anger has turned against Democrats in Washington and how dramatically the political landscape has shifted during President Obama's first year in office."

Other findings:

--63% of Massachusetts special election voters think the country is seriously off-track.

--Brown got two-thirds of them.

--Almost two-out-of-three Brown supporters intended their vote as an opposition message to Democrats in D.C.

--47% say the federal government is doing too many things better left to individuals and business.

--75% of Brown voters want him to work with both parties.

--58% of Tuesday's voters don't like what Republicans are doing either, whatever that is.

--43% of Massachusetts' Tuesday voters like the Obama-congressional healthcare bills. But 48% don't.

-- Andrew Malcolm

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Related items:

Brown's win also great for Fox News

Brown's win trouble for Nevada's Harry Reid?

Republican Scott Brown's upset of Martha Coakley in historic Senate race

Far left has taken over Democratic Party: Sen. Bayh

The blame game: Who lost Massachusetts?

Obama personally joins Massachusetts quake relief

Will Massachusetts be Obama's third-time charm or third strike?

Democrats eye sneaky tactics to save ObamaCare

Photos: Associated Press; Reuters.

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