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A $2,012 toilet paper wedding dress gives new meaning to 'cheap and chic'

June 28, 2012 | 11:01 am


A wedding can be the most expensive soiree you'll ever throw. There's the caterer, the flowers, a band and, of course, the dress. But what if you decided to do away with all the embroidery, lace and taffeta for a dress material that was, say, a little more economical? How about a gown made of plain white toilet paper?

That's the idea behind's eighth toilet paper wedding dress contest. The site asked people to use nothing more than Charmin toilet paper (one of the contest's sponsors), tape, glue and/or needle and thread to make a wedding dress, then submit pictures. The submissions were judged on creativity, originality, beauty and the use of toilet paper.

The winning design came from Susan Brennan, a 26-year-old aspiring artist and designer from Orchard Lake, Mich. Brennan used 10 rolls of Charmin toilet paper to make her Bohemian Cupcake dress. She won the grand prize of $2,012 for this year's entry. Brennan was also the 2011 grand prize winner.


A second-place prize of $1,000 went to Katrina Chalifoux, a 50-year-old electronics technician and mechanic from Knoxville, Tenn. Chalifoux used 28 double rolls of Charmin to make her dress. She is a three-time contestant and the 2008 grand prize winner.


A third-place prize of $500 went to first-time contestant Jennifer Henry, a 31-year-old alternative material designer and stylist from Las Vegas, Nev. Henry used 36 rolls of Charmin and no needle or thread. Instead she used packing tap and double-stick tape to keep her dress together. 


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-- Jenn Harris

Photos: From top,  grand prize winner Susan Brennan in her toilet paper dress,  Katrina Chalifoux's entry and Jennifer Henry's submission. Credit: