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Word up: The return of the 'Sex and the City' nameplate necklace

Cockney Sarah Jessica Parker's "Carrie" necklace in HBO's "Sex and the City" helped bring urban chic into high fashion -- and was one of the only constant pieces in her character's ever-evolving wardrobe.

When the show became a hit, we all ran out to get a nameplate necklace (my "Emili" necklace is suitably rough-hewn, hand-crafted by an East L.A. high-schooler). But the flames cooled on the trend rather quickly; and we all moved on to diamond solitaire pendants, bib-style statement necklaces, etc.

But lately, I've been noticing the return of wordy necklaces -- sometimes spelling out names, but more often calling out locales and phrases.

And hip fashion companies are getting on board with the resurgence, too. Topshop's U.S. website, for example, has an array of phrase-y necklaces on display, spelling out "Essex," "I Love London," "Ooh-La-La" and "Cockney," among other sentiments.

But in the end, I'm still a fan of the original ghetto-gold name necklace (I even like the diamond-encrusted ones); the more frilly the script, the better. SoulJewelry.com has fab ones that will last forever, ranging from $100 to $200.

-- Emili Vesilind

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An alternative to the typical holiday bling

Photo: Topshop "Cockney" necklace, $20. Photo credit: Topshop

 
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I love name plate necklaces! Glad they are coming back. I got my first one when I turned 15. These necklaces never really go out of style amongst young, urban, Latinas. I now have 2 - one gold, one silver. I'll have to dig up a picture of one from like the 1930s that I saw.



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