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Super Bowl battle of the brands continues

February 4, 2009 |  3:47 pm

Hundreds of people lined up on Tuesday at a Denny's restaurant in Montebello to take advantage of a free Grand Slam breakfast promotion that was made during a Super Bowl XLIII commercial.

Market research experts are now parsing data to determine who won the Super Bowl XLIII battle of the brands.

The contest runs the gamut from the 30-second commercials that cost an average of $3 million to stadium signage and product placement during the game broadcast on NBC.

Only time will tell whether commercials -- such as Denny's well-received promise to serve up free Grand Slam breakfasts -- spur consumers to spend during what's shaping up to be a rough recession. (Denny's said it spent about $5 million on Super Bowl advertising and the cost of 2 million free breakfasts.)

The super-sized sales job isn't over, either.

BayTSP reports that, as of 10 a.m. today, commercials that initially aired during NBC's Super Bowl XLIII broadcast subsequently had been watched online more than 28 million times.

The Los Gatos-based market research firm tracks consumer access to videos on such websites as YouTube, Daily Motion and NBC.com. The “Transformers 2” movie trailer that appeared during the NBC game broadcast has been viewed more than 3.6 million times on various sites. The "G.I. Joe" movie trailer was in second place with more than 1.6 million views.

In a twist, BayTSP reports that "Veggie Love," a People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals commercial that NBC declined to show has been viewed more than 564,000 times -- making it the

13th most popular commercial with a Super Bowl connection.

The battle of the brands also includes companies that got their names or products incorporated into the game broadcast -- starting with Raymond James, whose name is on the NFL stadium where Super Bowl XXLIII was played.

Joyce Julius Associates Inc., an Ann Arbor, Mich.-based market research firm set the value of the financial service company's media exposure at $37.3 million. That figure includes coverage at the stadium during the Super Bowl week and on game day, when the company's stadium signage was on camera, as well as on-air mentions by NBC broadcasters.

Then there's the fight for visibility among companies that have paid a premium to have their names or products incorporated into NBC's Super Bowl XLIII broadcast.

Gatorade won that battle, according to Image Impact, a Kansas City-based market research firm that measures the time that brands appear on television. The firm determined that Gatorade's name or its new "G" logo were on screen for nearly 27 minutes.

Most of that visibility came from paying to sponsor the Gatorade Halftime Report. But the brand also paid to have its bottles positioned on the pregame commentators' desk, and Gatorade towels, cups and coolers were evident on the sidelines -- most notably when Pittsburgh Steelers players used a Gatorade cooler to give winning Coach Mike Tomlin the traditional shower.

That all added up to $30.1 million worth of exposure for Gatorade, according to Impact.

-- Greg Johnson

Photo: Hundreds of people lined up on Tuesday at a Denny's restaurant in Montebello to take advantage of a free Grand Slam breakfast promotion that was made during a Super Bowl XLIII commercial. Credit: Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times

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