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Controversy over reporting of porn actor's HIV case

October 19, 2010 |  7:51 am

The San Fernando Valley clinic where a porn actor tested HIV-positive last week has delayed reporting of final results to county health officials.

The clinic is required to report the results and a slew of information about the individual to the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health within seven days of the initial test, which occurred Oct. 9, according to Karen Tynan, a lawyer for the Sherman Oaks clinic, Adult Industry Medical Healthcare Foundation, known as AIM.

Tynan said the clinic had not reported results by the deadline on Saturday. On Monday, clinic officials still had not reported results, according to a public health department spokesman. Tynan could not be reached late Monday.

Officials from the Los Angeles-based AIDS Healthcare Foundation who have pushed for more enforcement of condom use, testing and other safe-sex practice in the porn industry noted the missed deadline and called on government officials to release more information about the case.

On Friday, members of the group had appeared before the Los Angeles City Council to demand that it stop issuing permits for porn productions while the positive test is investigated. Some of the largest porn production companies in the Valley suspended filming last week, but the shutdown is far from complete. Council members said they do not plan to take any immediate action.

County health officials released no new information late Monday.

"In the vacuum of any concrete information from the clinic or the county, the incident is garnering growing international media attention and has created untold anxiety for scores of adult performers working in the industry who want information and answers," said Michael Weinstein, the group's president. "If this was a manhunt for a dangerous criminal or an Amber Alert for a lost or kidnapped child, you can be certain that government officials would have addressed the public and the communities affected many times over by now."

-- Molly Hennessy-Fiske