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Complicated waterfront development passes in Redondo Beach

November 3, 2010 |  6:51 pm

Redondo_beach_development Voters in Redondo Beach narrowly approved a waterfront development measure so complicated that it took 180 pages to explain in election materials sent out to city residents.

Measure G establishes new zoning and land-use standards for King Harbor and the pier, the AES power plant site and a section of Catalina Avenue leading to Pacific Coast Highway. It passed with just over 52% of the vote Tuesday, according to semi-final results from the Los Angeles County registrar’s office.

“We finally, with Measure G, have a sensible and balanced framework to guide future investments and improvements to our harbor,” said Mayor Michael A. Gin, who was among those backing the measure.

“This is something that will benefit not only our harbor area, but it will help to improve the economic vitality, sustainability and quality of life for our entire city for years to come.”

The measure faced stiff opposition from the group known as Building a Better Redondo, which argued that it will allow too much additional construction – 940,000 square feet -- and create traffic gridlock.

The Redondo Beach City Council approved the new guidelines in 2008, shortly before voters endorsed a city charter amendment sponsored by Building a Better Redondo requiring that major zoning changes be put on the ballot.

The Redondo Beach City Council approved the new guidelines in 2008, shortly before voters endorsed Measure DD, a city charter amendment sponsored by Building a Better Redondo that required that major zoning changes be put on the ballot.

Jim Light, who chairs the group, congratulated his opponents in a blog post Wednesday.

“They put in a good campaign,” he said. “The voters were nearly split down the middle on this one. It was a good turnout. BBR offers to help move forward with healing any divides should the city care to enlist our help.”

-- Alexandra Zavis

Photo: After the council voted to rezone the harbor in 2008 to allow the development, voters passed a growth-limitation amendment to the charter. Credit: Wally Skalij / Los Angeles Times

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