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Cindy McCain is of two minds about the military's "don't ask, don't tell" policy on gays

November 13, 2010 |  4:08 pm

Cindy and John McCain

Cindy McCain seems to be of two minds about the "don't ask, don't tell" policy of the U.S. government toward gays serving in the military.

Earlier this week the wife of newly reelected Arizona Sen. John McCain appeared in an anti-bully video for the group NOH8. There, she said, "Our political and religious leaders tell LGBT youth that they have no future ... They can't serve our country openly."

Her husband, a naval veteran like his father and grandfather, has his doubts about changing that policy. The Obama administration has vowed to repeal the Clinton-era law that allows gays to serve in the all-volunteer military as long as they do not announce their sexual preference.

But although he repeats the repeal vow, President Obama has lagged in providing leadership to actually accomplish it, at least before the midterm election this month, which didn't turn out so well for his Democratic party. Obama cites the need for more study by the armed services.

And the delay has annoyed many members of his political base, some of whom interrupted his campaign speeches this year with protests. A recent leak from the ongoing Pentagon study said changing "don't ask, don't tell" would create minimal difficulties.

When some people this week began pointing out the apparent policy disagreement between the two McCains, Cindy McCain, who is traveling in Europe, sent out a message on her Twitter page:

"I fully support the NOH8 campaign and all it stands for and am proud to be a part of it. But I stand by my husband's stance on DADT."

Maybe, since no one asked, she shouldn't have told.

-- Andrew Malcolm

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Photo: Mark Boster / Los Angeles Times

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