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Despite vote doubts, violence, Obama still vows talks with Iran regime

June 15, 2009 |  5:44 pm
Government militia member throws rock at people protesting alleged voting irregularities in Iran

After a morning trip to Chicago for a healthcare reform speech to the nation's doctors who belong to the American Medical Assn. and an afternoon meeting with Italian Prime Minister Berlusconi, President Obama said today he feels talking with Iran carries real possibilities for diplomatic progress.

As usual, we're publishing the president's full remarks on Iran below for context.

But while Obama said he was watching the alleged voting irregularities and resulting violence against protesters by government militia (see photo above) and was "deeply troubled," he still felt the need to sit down and talk with Iran's leaders. And that the U.S. was worried not to appear to be trying to influence the decisions of Iran and become a domestic football.

-- Andrew Malcolm

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Remarks on Iran by President Obama during a White House photo op, June 15, 2009

Obviously all of us have been watching the news from Iran. And I want to start off by being very clear that it is up to Iranians to make decisions about who Iran's leaders will be; that we....

...respect Iranian sovereignty and want to avoid the United States being the issue inside of Iran, which sometimes the United States can be a handy political football -- or discussions with the United States.

Having said all that, I am deeply troubled by the violence that I've been seeing on television. I think that the democratic process -- free speech, the ability of people to peacefully dissent -- all those are universal values and need to be respected. And whenever I see violence perpetrated on people who are peacefully dissenting, and whenever the American people see that, I think they're, rightfully, troubled.

My understanding is, is that the Iranian government says that they are going to look into irregularities that have taken place. We weren’t on the ground, we did not have observers there, we did not have international observers on hand, so I can't state definitively one way or another what happened with respect to the election. 

But what I can say is that there appears to be a sense on the part of people who were so hopeful and so engaged and so committed to democracy who now feel betrayed. And I think it's important that, moving forward, whatever investigations take place are done in a way that is not resulting in bloodshed and is not resulting in people being stifled in expressing their views.

Now, with respect to the United States and our interactions with Iran, I've always believed that as odious as I consider some of President Ahmadinejad's statements, as deep as the differences that exist between the United States and Iran on a range of core issues, that the use of tough, hard-headed diplomacy -- diplomacy with no illusions about Iran and the nature of the differences between our two countries -- is critical when it comes to pursuing a core set of our national security interests, specifically, making sure that we are not seeing a nuclear arms race in the Middle East triggered by Iran obtaining a nuclear weapon; making sure that Iran is not exporting terrorist activity. Those are core interests not just to the United States but I think to a peaceful world in general.

We will continue to pursue a tough, direct dialogue between our two countries, and we'll see where it takes us. But even as we do so, I think it would be wrong for me to be silent about what we've seen on the television over the last few days. 

And what I would say to those people who put so much hope and energy and optimism into the political process, I would say to them that the world is watching and inspired by their participation, regardless of what the ultimate outcome of the election was. And they should know that the world is watching.

And particularly to the youth of Iran, I want them to know that we in the United States do not want to make any decisions for the Iranians, but we do believe that the Iranian people and their voices should be heard and respected.    ###

Photo: Vahid Salemi / Associated Press

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