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Baseball: Another victory for two-sport standouts

When Tyler Schultz of Lakewood signed with San Francisco for baseball on Wednesday, it was another small victory for two-sport standouts.

Schultz also is the starting quarterback for Lakewood's 8-1 football team, having thrown 26 touchdown passes and one interception. There are still lots of people who say you can hurt your scholarship chances by not focusing year-round on a single sport.

But thankfully, athletes keep proving people wrong. Schultz is also a top catcher in baseball.

-- Eric Sondheimer

 
Comments () | Archives (6)

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Sam Fernando Valle

This is very, very important topic. I Remember when High School was exciting because of all the choices available to me. 1,2, 3,4 sports a year! Clubs, electives,dances. Today, the kid's got to take the 13 core subjects required for NCAA, practice his one sport year round and god forbid your trying to acheive a 3.5 GPA or higher without being a genius. Someone provide a list of these coaches like the Marmonte League BB coach mentioned by the Ziphound so parents can be aware and make better choices.

Tim Schultz

Ziphoud-Well said. It takes a special athlete these days to not just endure the physical rigors of two sports (in this case, baseball & football), but to deal with the emotional/phsychological demands of the "push & pull" from both programs. Having two incredible coaching staffs that can flex and accept the desires of the athlete and respect that he/she will give both sports 100% of what they got, day in & day out, is crucial. For anyone who is in this situation, I can tell you that it is very helpful to converse with coaches from both programs and set the expectations up front. We were blessed to have two incredible coaching staffs that worked with my son to make this happen. The end result...everybody won!

Whiffed

I'd like to relate a comment I heard during a parents meeting at our high school for baseball. The coach talked about how the first several weeks after the holidays were hard on the players due to the difficult conditioning they would be asked to do. He followed that up by saying that didn't include the football players. He knew they would show up for the early practices in shape and stronger than the one sport players.

Ziphound

I totally agree with the importance of having a supportive coach when the athletes either have a second sport, or even a key role in choir, band or academic pursuits. It seems like the private school coaches are more flexible this way because they are committed to building well rounded people, not just narrowly specialized athletes.

Here in the Marmonte league, there are a number of two sport (football and baseball) athletes. One of the head Marmonte baseball coaches runs his program expecting 100% "loyalty" from his players (by that I mean year-round participation in VIBL, fall league, trips out of state, and of course spring season). For those who have other sport interests, they suffer ridicule. For example, in one baseball game where a two-sport athlete was not having a good at bat, I heard this coach say for many to hear, "I hate these damn football players". He just doesn't respect the fact that these athletes want to do more than play baseball 12 months a year for him. Myopia and selfishness on display for sure.

SJKing

Kids should not be forced or pressured into playing just one sport unless that's iswhatthey choose. Let them experience everything. They might not get a college offer in one sport, but could in another.

Mike Guardabascio

Goes to show you how critical coach support is. Coach Mac at Lakewood never penalized Tyler for participating in Connie Mack tournaments and showcases even during August when the football team was practicing; him allowing Tyler room to pursue his dream of playing college baseball means that Tyler gets what he wanted most, and Mac gets a QB with a 26-1 QB/INT ratio. Talk about a win-win.


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