The Daily Mirror

Larry Harnisch reflects on Los Angeles history

Category: JFK

Matt Weinstock, Nov. 8, 1960





  Nov. 8, 1960, Comics  

Nov. 8, 1960: Today’s election means an end to the madness over political bumper stickers, Matt Weinstock says.

CONFIDENTIAL TO "TOO SMART": A smart girl should be smart enough not to look too smart.

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Kennedy Wins




 
  Nov. 8, 1960, Cover  

 
  Nov. 9, 1960, Extra  


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Nov. 8-9, 1960: The Associated Press reports: “Sen. John F. Kennedy swept so close to the presidency early today that practically everybody except the GOP high command proclaimed him the victor.

“And while Nixon clutched at hopes that belated tallies in such vital states as Michigan, Illinois and his own California could swing things his way until 12:15 a.m., he then issued a statement saying:

"If the present trend continues, Sen. Kennedy will be the next president of the United States."

“His wife, Pat, wept on TV before viewers coast to coast.”




Matt Weinstock, Nov. 7, 1960




 
 
  Nov. 7, 1960, Comics  


Nov. 7, 1960: The county tax ax fell last week on property owners. They received their annual valentines from tax collector H.L. Byram, who gets the blame but merely does the bookkeeping. Some homeowners were merely nicked. Others were chopped. All are bleeding. Many say despairingly that they don't know how they're going to pay the increases, Matt Weinstock says.

On the jump, a full-page letter from Jack L. Warner urging people to vote for the Nixon-Lodge ticket.

DEAR ABBY: Bill (not his real name) and I are very much in love but we are not old enough to get married without our parents' consent. We thought if we HAD to get married they would sign for us, so we went ahead and followed that plan. Now it turns out...
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Kennedy Leads 1% in Final Poll






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  Nov. 7, 1960, Cover
 

Nov. 7, 1960: Ernie Bushmiller is almost never topical – in fact it would be easy to transpose panels of “Nancy” from one decade to another. But here’s Sluggo, dressed in his outfit from the 1930s, commenting on the 1960 presidential race.

The Gallup Poll gives Sen. John F. Kennedy a slight edge … and The Times runs a Page 1 editorial by

Publisher Norman Chandler urging readers to vote for Vice President Richard Nixon: “Tuesday you will cast a ballot for the next president of the United States. Will it be marked by you as a thinking American -- or as the spellbound fan of a current television personality?”

And here’s a real surprise. The Times suspends “Rex Morgan, M.D.” at the request of a family whose child has leukemia because the cartoon’s plot line deals with the disease.   
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Kennedy-Nixon Race an End to the Era of ‘Great Men’





  Nov. 6, 1960, Bill Henry  


Nov. 6, 1960: I rarely, if ever, post Bill Henry’s columns because they are usually not terribly relevant or interesting. This one is a surprise, however, and well worth reading.

“Dwight David Eisenhower, whose comparatively youthful successor will be named come Tuesday, will certainly have one outstanding distinction: He will go down in history as the last 'Great Man' to be elected president of the United States. There are no more 'great' men and there never will be. Pitiless publicity has ruthlessly eliminated this breed....


“The persistent probing of reporters and the vastly widened scope of coverage by newspapers, magazines, radio and TV have stripped candidates naked. No longer could Harry Truman get away with his endless poker parties or FDR spend a dozen years in the White House and die with thousands and thousands of Americans unaware that he couldn't walk. Nowadays, the candidates have no secrets whatever....”





Kennedy Leads Nixon in Gallup Poll





  Nov. 4, 1960, Kennedy  
  Los Angeles Times file photo  

  Nov. 5, 1960, Nixon Editorial  


Nov. 4, 1960: John F. Kennedy makes a campaign appearance in Amarillo, Texas, and The Times publishes a Page 1 editorial backing Richard Nixon.


On the jump, the latest Gallup Poll, conducted in late October,  finds likely voters shifting to Kennedy-Johnson 51%-45% over Nixon-Lodge.

"As far as attitudes toward the man are concerned, it may be that the series of four TV debates has been a decisive factor in the 1960 campaign," George Gallup wrote.

"The sentiment among those who watched the debates was that Kennedy did a better job. In addition, during the period in which the four debates were conducted, enthusiasm for Nixon fell off."


Also on the jump, introducing the vice president at a rally at the Pan-Pacific Auditorium: Nixon Democrat Ronald Reagan.
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GOP Truth Squad Attacks Kennedy’s Record




 
 
  Nov. 3, 1960, Comics
 

 
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Nov. 3, 1960: The Republican Party Truth Squad visits Los Angeles on its U.S. tour.  The Republican officials "accused the Democratic nominee of 'shocking distortions' concerning U.S. strength and progress achieved under the Eisenhower administration," The Times said.


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Kennedy Visits L.A.!





  John_f_kennedy_1960_1101_crop  
  Photograph by Jack Gaunt / Los Angeles Times  

  john_f_kennedy_1960_1101_02_crop  
  Photograph by Art Rogers / Los Angeles Times  

Nov. 1, 1960: Chris Morales, a regular Daily Mirror reader, asked if I could find any photos of John F. Kennedy’s visit to East L.A. Community College. Here you go, Chris. The top photo shows office workers at 8th Street and Broadway waving to Kennedy’s motorcade. The bottom photo shows Kennedy at East L.A. Community College’s stadium, accompanied by his sister Patricia, Adlai Stevenson and Sen. Clair Engle (D-Calif.).

And if any Daily Mirror reader has personal recollections of meeting Kennedy or Vice President Richard Nixon  during the 1960 presidential race, please send them in!





Nixon Accuses Kennedy of Using Notes During Debate




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Oct. 14, 1960: Vice President Richard Nixon accuses Sen. John F. Kennedy (D-Mass.) of breaking their agreement by using notes during their televised debate. Press secretary Pierre Salinger said the only item Kennedy had was the text of President Eisenhower's letter to Sen. Green, but later added that Kennedy had a “copy of a page from a book by Gen. Matthew Ridgway, former Army chief of staff, and some quotations from the late Secretary of State Dulles."


If you recall the debates, you'll remember that Nixon sweated heavily under the hot TV lights, and The Times says, "The studio, at the request of his aides, had lowered the temperature from its normal 72 deg. to a chill 58 but even so, he mopped perspiration from his upper lip and chin 13 times during the program while cameras were focused elsewhere."


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Kennedy, Nixon in Tight Race, Poll Finds




 
  Oct. 12, 1960, Comics


Oct. 12, 1960: The race between Sen. John F. Kennedy (D-Mass.) and Vice President Richard Nixon is so close that if the election were held today, the edge in the popular vote would probably be determined by a small minority who are – as of now -- undecided, a Gallup poll finds.

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Kennedy and Nixon Meet in Televised Debate




 
Sept. 27, 1960
 

Sept. 27, 1960: While we at the Daily Mirror HQ were busy with The Times bombing, look who had a presidential debate: Sen. John F. Kennedy (D-Mass.) and Vice President Richard Nixon. If you’re of the right vintage, you probably remember watching the debates on television.

On the jump, viewers express their opinions of Kennedy and Nixon. And, frankly, it’s nice to see that The Times surveyed a variety of people – white Republicans in South Pasadena, African American Democrats in Watts  and Latinos in East L.A. – to get a cross-section of the city.

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Kennedy, Nixon, Agree on TV Debates



 
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Sept. 1, 1960: Sen. John F. Kennedy (D-Mass.) and Vice President Richard Nixon agree to a series of televised debates. The latest census shows that 88% of American homes have TV sets, in contrast to the 12% found in the 1950 census. In addition, 11% of U.S. homes have two or more sets and  “urban areas are 91% covered by television,”  The Times says.

Also on the jump, early movie actress Enid Markey, a leading lady in many Thomas Ince films before she left to pursue a stage career in New York, returns to Hollywood for a role in the TV show "Bringing Up Buddy."[She was Jane in the first Tarzan movie, starring Elmo Lincoln].


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