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Arabs on Alert, Baseball Strike? February 20, 1969

February 20, 2009 |  9:00 am
1969_0220_times_wax_museum
Nancy Sinatra ... in WAX!
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To simulate prejudice, brunet students eat at a table designed "No Blondes."
At left, Arab countries prepare for retaliation for a terrorist attack on an El Al airliner at Zurich.

Also... Take the time to read Robert Kistler's excellent nondupe on a police officer's view of the changing culture within the LAPD after the Watts Riots. We evidently didn't use his actual name, but called him "Paul Anderson." The article explores what Chief Tom Reddin called "the terrible tightrope."

"The tightrope stretches between the 'hard-nosed' policing of minorities of the pre-1965 era [the William Parker years--lrh] and efforts to open channels of communication between police and minorities today," Kistler says.
1969_0220_times_nondupe_ro1
"The old ways aren't going to be continued, and as an officer you either 'get with it' or get off."
1969_0220_times_nondupe_ro2 "Don't get the wrong impression.
None of us is going to be namby-
pamby out there."
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Scientists study oil spill.
After he shot Robert F. Kennedy, Sirhan B. Sirhan was "enormously composed."

"Amid this hurricane of sound and feeling, he seemed like the eye of the hurricane.... He seemed purged," according to George Plimpton, testifying for the prosecution in Sirhan's trial.

Gov. Ronald Reagan reveals the source of his statement that a dean at San Francisco State was forced at knifepoint to admit a group of black students. 

Pueblo crewman Lt. (jg) Timothy Harris describes his treatment by  North Korean captors.   
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Ro$ale$? Oh you sports guys!

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Rayco eight-track stereo, $49.95!

Spring training or strike?

Players and owners were battling over how much money should be contributed to the pension fund. Most of the player representatives had rejected the owners' latest offer, but several current or future high-profile players were reporting for workouts.

"I expect there will be some resentment that I'm going to work out, but I need the work," Nolan Ryan told United Press International. Ryan was coming off a 6-9 season with the Mets and weighed 210 pounds, compared with 195 at the end of the season.

"I suppose the other players will be clipping my remarks and putting them on the wall and throwing darts at them, but I am ready to go and I might have eight practice fields all to myself," said the Braves' Pat Jarvis.

George Scott of the Red Sox hadn't reported yet but would be in camp next week. "Some of the players can afford to go without a salary, but the majority can't and I'm one of them," he said. "I'm supporting my wife and my mother, two households, really."

The Angels' player representative, second baseman Bobby Knoop, tried to put the potential labor dispute in perspective. Knoop told The Times' Ross Newhan on Feb. 2: "Perhaps some of this seems insignificant to the public. But we are not talking about a job that lasts for 20 or 30 years. The average player goes from day to day. At 32 or 33, he's looking for something else."

-- Keith Thursby

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