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June 18, 1938

June 18, 2008 |  5:03 am

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Dropcap_f_1928_2 irst, we have tragic news from Berlin: Panicked Jews wander the streets in hopes of avoiding mass arrests in which entire families are hauled away in the middle of the night.

"...officials explained that the anti-Jewish activities were necessary because 'the Jews' behavior lately has become provocative, resulting in growing indignation among the population,' " The Times says.

The Times leads with a story about repercussions of Earle Kynette's conviction in the Harry Raymond bombing. The most significant story is on the jump: Councilman Hyde introduces a resolution calling for the resignations of Mayor Frank Shaw, Police Chief James Davis and the entire Police Commission. The resolution was sent to a committee, where it was expected to lie dormant. But by the end of the year, a recall election will have changed the landscape.

Also note Betty Rowland, the "Ball of Fire," at the Follies.



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Dropcap_t_1928 he Times concludes its series on traffic in Los Angeles with a call to action: "Are the beaches and the sea to be separated by impenetrable masses of congested cars? Is mankind to stagnate in Southern California, fettered by its own lethargy when a means of release is offered? Those are the questions that must be answered either willingly or unwillingly. They cannot be escaped."

"...The monster of Frankenstein--the motorcar which has wrestled free from its master--must be made a willing and useful slave again!"

To emphasize his point, Ainsworth cites some figures from the Auto Club: Going from 1st to 10th on Broadway took 14 minutes, 12 seconds by auto and 12 minutes, 2 seconds by streetcar. The Auto Club re-created a horse and buggy trip that took 10 minutes, 21 seconds.

Ainsworth also talks about funding the freeways, a subject that I will leave to interested readers.

And yes, the contrast between the Holocaust in Germany and Southern Californians worrying about traffic is pretty stark, isn't it?

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