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Facebook users give iPhone app thumbs down

July 21, 2011 |  3:37 pm

Zuckerberg

Facebook users don't like its iPhone app.

The social networking site planned to release an update to the app after more than 20,000 posted negative reviews on Apple’s App store, the Financial Times reports.

One user called it the "most frustrating app on the market."

Facebook has updated the app a number of times but that hasn't helped, users say. Said one: "With every single update it just gets worse and worse."

Users complain the app frequently crashes, doesn't update properly and doesn't deliver messages or notifications.

It's an unfortunate development for Facebook, which has had one of the most downloaded iPhone apps since it rolled out in 2008, with 84 million active users.

Facebook spokesman Derick Mains acknowledged "bugs" that have led to "performance issues" in the latest version of the iPhone app. He said a new app would be available soon.

Facebook Chief Executive Mark Zuckerberg pledged that his company would make connecting with users on the go a priority in 2011 as social networking becomes increasingly mobile. TechCrunch reported last month that Facebook may not have focused its attention on the iPhone app because it plans to challenge Apple's App Store

Mains disputed the impression that Facebook is "neglecting" the iPhone app.

"We are fully committed to offering our iPhone users the best possible Facebook experience and have been innovating on the platform since its launch four years ago," he said. 

The negative reviews come as Google+, Google's new social networking service to rival Facebook, rolls out its iPhone app.

RELATED:

Google+ iPhone app released; no iPad or iPod Touch support yet [Updated]

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Facebook launches free mobile app for more than 2,500 phones

-- Jessica Guynn

Photo: Facebook Chief Executive Mark Zuckerberg. Credit: Justin Sullivan / Getty Images 

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