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Charlie Sheen will stay on 'Two and a Half Men' for two more years [Updated]

May 17, 2010 |  7:49 pm

Getprev-3 CBS can breathe a sigh of relief.

Charlie Sheen has agreed to a new contract that will keep him on the hit comedy, "Two and a Half Men," for two more seasons, a person familiar with the situation told The Times.

Sheen's new deal will make him one of the highest paid TV stars in the medium's history. The controversial actor was already making close to $1 million an episode under his own deal, and his new pact is expected to be well over seven figures per episode. Variety said it was in the neighborhood of $1.8 million and $1.9 million, per-episode.

Although Sheen had made noise about walking away from the show, neither CBS which airs the program or Warner Bros. Television, which produces it, took his grumbling seriously. 

As early as this week, Warner Bros. executives indicated to Sheen that the offer in front of him would be the last one he would receive. It must have done the job because Sheen's camp stopped negotiating and signed the deal.

"Two and a Half Men" remains CBS' highest rated sitcom and is the 9 p.m. anchor of its successful Monday line-up. However, there is a chance that the network may move the show to Wednesday night to try to build up a strong night of comedies on the back of Charlie Sheen and company.

CBS wanted the Sheen deal closed now because it is unveiling its fall schedule to advertisers on Wednesday and did not want a cloud of uncertainty hanging over its primetime line-up.

News of Sheen's new deal was first reported by TMZ.

[Updated: 7:46 p.m. Sheen issued a statement about his contract renewal:  "To put a fitting end on the two-and-one-half months of whirlwind speculation, I'm looking forward to returning to my CBS home on Monday nights.  I want to thank Les Moonves for his support.]

-- Joe Flint

twitter.com/JBFlint


Photo: Charlie Sheen outside the Pitkin County Courthouse in Aspen, Colo., in March. Credit Rick Giase / EPA



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