No Steve Jobs doll: Company blames family -- and Apple lawyers

Steve_Jobs_Action_figure

A Chinese company has apparently called off plans to sell an action figure made in the likeness of the late Apple founder and tech wizard Steve Jobs, saying it was responding to pressure from Apple lawyers, as well as from the Jobs family.

A statement on the In Icons website said the doll was intended as an homage to Jobs, who died in October at 56 after a career spent changing the face of movies, music, computers and more. The company said it believed that its figurine would have survived any legal challenges.

But in the end, In Icons said, it decided to stop production on the potential collectors item -- which would have sold for $99.99 -- because the Jobs family was said to be so distraught over it.

PHOTOS: Steve Jobs, 1955-2011

"Unfortunately we have received immense pressure from the lawyers of Apple and Steve Jobs family," the statement said. "Though we still believe we have not overstepped any legal boundaries, we have decided to completely stop ... out of our heartfelt sensitivity to the feelings of the Jobs family."

The statement concluded: "Lastly, we wish to thank everyone for their admiration and appreciate of the figurine, and again we offer our sincere apologies to affected fans."

The company raised eyebrows this month when the media caught wind of plans to sell a remarkably realistic action figure that included all the Jobs trademarks: the New Balance kicks, the blue jeans, the black mock turtleneck, the silver-framed glasses, the beard.

The doll was scheduled to begin shipping in February. It was slated to arrive with plenty of accessories, such as extra glasses and two apples, including one with a chomp taken out of it. The figurine was to arrive in a box that mimicked Apple's clean, minimalistic white packaging.

A representative for Apple did not reply to a request for comment before this story was posted. 

RELATED:

Obituary: Steve Jobs dies at 56

First look at Steve Jobs biography

VIDEO: Steve Jobs' famed Stanford University commencement address

-- Rene Lynch
Twitter / renelynch

Photo: The remarkably real doll. Via www.inicons.com

 
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Rene Lynch has been an editor and writer in Metro, Sports, Business, Calendar and Food. @ReneLynch

As an editor and reporter, Michael Muskal has covered local, national, economic and foreign issues at three newspapers, including the Los Angeles Times. @latimesmuskal


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