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Category: Rob Pattinson

Cannes 2012: With 'Cosmopolis,' Rob Pattinson seeks acting cred

May 25, 2012 | 11:58 am

Pattico
"Twilight" stars Kristen Stewart and Rob Pattinson have sex multiple times in Cannes (separately, and on screen) but it's a very different kind of lovemaking. As Marylou, Dean Moriarty's wife in "On the Road," Stewart's sex is uninhibited and hedonistic. As Eric Packer, the troubled Wall Street Master of the Universe in "Cosmopolis," Pattinson's sex is mechanical and joyless, as if he's trying to exorcise some unhappiness instead of simply indulging in pleasure.

Audiences got a glimpse of that exorcism on Friday when the David Cronenberg-directed "Cosmopolis" premiered at the Cannes Film Festival. The contrast in the "Twilight" stars' bedroom manner proved telling.

"On the Road" is a free-form depiction of an era and has won largely plaudits at Cannes. "Cosmopolis" is a claustrophobic  look at a troubled billionaire who is watching the world implode around him from his limousine, and it landed far more mixed responses from critics and festival-goers. Some thought it a timely, idea-driven gem, while a far larger number saw in it a purposelessness reminiscent of Packer's moments in flagrante.

Based on Don DeLillo's dialogue-heavy novella, "Cosmopolis" tells of Packer, a billionaire financier in New York who undertakes the simple task of having his limo driver escort him to a barber across town, despite vague threats on Packer's life and, possibly, the larger world. For all the intrigue and respect he elicits, this isn't a man who's liked very much; that’s what you get for climbing to the top of the corporate heap, or, maybe, for becoming the world’s biggest teen idol.

The setting is typical Cronenberg, a place that looks much like our world but somehow isn't quite. As the trip unfolds, the billionaire, speaking in that Cronenbergian flat affect, entertains a host of acquaintances who pop in and out of his limo, often to talk about things like technocapitalism and its wonders (per Packer) or dangers (per others, and perhaps the film as a whole).  These guests both in the limo and outside it (Sarah Gadon, Emily Hampshire and Paul Giamatti co-star) engage in elliptical exchanges with Packer about their views of the universe, often in turns of DeLillo-ian eloquence and/or impenetrability.

Continue reading »

Cannes 2012: Festival turns 65 with a lineup heavy on U.S. titles

May 16, 2012 |  5:00 am

Cannes Film Festival

If all film festivals are balancing acts, it stands to reason that the annual extravaganza at Cannes, likely the world's most celebrated cinematic event, has more to balance than most. Especially this year.

Opening Wednesday night with Wes Anderson's oddly endearing “Moonrise Kingdom,” Cannes is celebrating its 65th anniversary this year and marking that milestone by embracing all kinds of opposites: old and young, dramatic and documentary, commercial and politically committed, avant-garde and classic, even American and not.

The U.S. presence seems especially strong, starting with the official poster, an Otto Bettmann photo of a luminous Marilyn Monroe blowing out a birthday cake candle. An 80- by 40-foot version looms impossibly large on an outside wall of the Palais des Festivals, while the building's inside walls feature photos of other Hollywood luminaries, including Orson Welles and Rita Hayworth, Clark Gable and Judy Garland, even Marlene Dietrich and Ernst Lubitsch, having a go at birthday cakes of their own.

Cheat Sheet: Cannes Film Festival 2012

On one level, American films are thick in the main competition, with a roster that includes new movies by Lee Daniels, who is following his Oscar-winning drama “Precious” with “The Paperboy,” and Jeff Nichols, whose “Mud” comes after the acclaimed apocalyptic meditation “Take Shelter.”

But some of the most eagerly anticipated American films — Walter Salles' take on Jack Kerouac's legendary “On the Road,” Andrew Dominik's Brad Pitt-starring “Killing Them Softly” (based on George V. Higgins' “Cogan's Trade”) and John Hillcoat's Prohibition era “Lawless” — were all directed by filmmakers who hail from other countries.

Speaking of elsewhere, new films are also on offer from such stalwarts as France's Jacques Audiard (“Rust & Bone”), Italy's Matteo Garrone (“Reality,” following up on “Gomorrah”), Britain's Ken Loach (“The Angels' Share”) and Austria's Michael Haneke (the Isabelle Huppert-starring “Amour”).

The honor of being the oldest director in the competition goes to 89-year-old Alain Resnais, here with the puckishly titled “You Haven't Seen Anything Yet.” Considerably younger, with films in the Un Certain Regard section, are debuting Americans Adam Leon, whose “Gimme the Loot” took the grand jury prize at this year's South by Southwest Film Festival in Austin, Texas, and Benh Zeitlin, whose “Beasts of the Southern Wild” did the same at Sundance in January.

Straddling the young-old divide in a personal way are Canadian director David Cronenberg, in competition with the Robert Pattinson-starring “Cosmopolis” from the Don DeLillo novel, and his son Brandon, in Un Certain Regard with the thriller “Antiviral.”

Though the world's artier directors are always to be found at the festival, Cannes is also determined to embroil itself in the commercial side of things, which it does by scheduling the animated adventure “Madagascar 3: Europe's Most Wanted” in an out-of-competition slot.

Then there are the numerous billboards for features that dot the city's streets and the fronts of hotels. Most noticeable this year is the way names that were considered edgy once upon a time have now become commercial enough to merit major-league spending.

Billboards could be seen not only for Quentin Tarantino's “Django Unchained” but also for Harmony Korine's “Spring Breakers.” And who should look right at home in the prime real estate of the entrance to the Carlton Hotel but Sacha Baron Cohen in full Admiral General Aladeen regalia for his satirical comedy “The Dictator.” Thus pass the bad boys of the world.

Perhaps even more startling, however, is the recent announcement from Canada's Alliance Films that it would charge Canadian journalists for interview access to the stars of some of the company's films.

If this is starting to sound all too frivolous, Cannes has political antidotes all ready to go. There will be a special screening of “The Oath of Tobruk,” Bernard-Henri Levy's doc about the fall of Moammar Kadafi, with “four key figures of the Libyan revolution” in attendance.

Closer to home is “The Central Park Five,” a quietly devastating documentary co-directed by Ken Burns, his daughter Sarah Burns and her husband, David McMahon, that examines how and why five innocent teenagers ended up being convicted of and imprisoned for the savage rape of a jogger in New York's Central Park in a case that became an international media sensation.

If you view film as a refuge from the cares of the real world, Cannes is ready for you as well. The ever-expanding Cannes Classics section features an impressive variety of restorations, including Alfred Hitchcock's silent “The Ring,” a 4-hour, 13-minute reconstruction of Sergio Leone's “Once Upon a Time in America” and Andrei Konchalovsky's aptly named “Runaway Train.”

Also, there are master class lectures by director Philip Kaufman (here with HBO's “Hemingway & Gellhorn” starring Nicole Kidman and Clive Owen) and 97-year-old Norman Lloyd, who has seen a lot (he co-founded the Mercury Theater with Welles) and remembers it all.

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— Kenneth Turan

Photo: A giant canvas of the official poster of the 65th Cannes Film Festival featuring Marilyn Monroe. Credit: Stephane Reix / EPA.


Home theater: Robert Pattinson makes ladies swoon in 'Bel Ami'

May 2, 2012 |  6:23 pm

Bel Ami

This week, 24 Frames introduces a feature new to the blog, highlighting some of the most interesting titles available on Video on Demand or on DVD and Blu-ray. Look for the column on Tuesdays.

'Bel Ami'
Available on VOD beginning May 4

Guy de Maupassant’s novel has been adapted for  the screen before (most memorably in 1947, with George Sanders and Angela Lansbury), but for their new version, directors Declan Donnellan and Nick Ormerod take advantage of some of the freedoms of modern moviemaking, making sure that De Maupassant’s tale of a social-climbing rake has plenty of sex and straight talk. Robert Pattinson plays the rake in question, who takes a job as a newspaper columnist in 1890s France and advances in his career thanks to his relationships with three aristocratic women (played by Uma Thurman, Kristin Scott Thomas and Christina Ricci). The film isn’t as artful and sophisticated as the similar “Dangerous Liaisons” -- and it’s better at light drawing-room machinations than heavier political and romantic drama -- but this new “Bel Ami” is remarkably assured as it depicts how a man with no discernible skills works his way up from whorehouses to elegant estates simply because he’s handsome. (The film opens in Los Angeles theaters June 8.)

'George Harrison: Living in the Material World'
Hip-O/Universal, $24.98; Blu-ray, $24.98/$99.99

What keeps Martin Scorsese’s “Living in the Material World” from being just another Beatles-championing documentary is that it focuses specifically on guitarist George Harrison’s warring impulses: He was a spiritual, caring person who tried to make other people feel loved, and he was a brutally honest, self-centered man who succumbed to his carnal desires and hoarded money. (Harrison did write “Taxman,” after all.) “Living in the Material World” is divided in two, with the first half dedicated to Harrison’s stint with the Beatles, and the second half covering his explorations into religion as a solo artist. But both halves are really the same story: about a man who strove to be humble, while also grumbling that he was under-appreciated. The documentary is available on DVD and Blu-ray, and in a deluxe set that includes a book of photographs and a CD containing early takes of 10 Harrison favorites.

'Haywire'
Lionsgate, $29.95; Blu-ray, $39.99

Director Steven Soderbergh and screenwriter Lem Dobbs return to the fast-paced, existential revenge-thriller mode of their 1999 film “The Limey” with “Haywire,” which stars real-life mixed martial arts specialist Gina Carano as a black-ops secret agent trying to track down and assassinate her handlers before they do the same to her. “Haywire” jumps back and forth in time and location and is packed with appearances by such actors as Michael Fassbender, Michael Douglas, Antonio Banderas, Channing Tatum and Ewan McGregor. But the story feels like an afterthought, and Soderbergh’s guerrilla filmmaking style at times makes “Haywire” resemble cheap, straight-to-video product. Still, Dobbs’ snappy dialogue and Soderbergh’s eye for the unusual go a long way. Some will appreciate that “Haywire” is a “pure” action flick: all kicks, little waste. The DVD and Blu-ray add two short featurettes. Available on VOD on May 1.

'W.E.'
Starz/Anchor Bay, $29.98; Blu-ray, $39.99

Say this for Madonna: She doesn’t lack for ambition. For her second film as a director (after the very strange “Filth and Wisdom”), the multi-platinum pop singer and her co-screenwriter, Alek Keshishian, attempt to tell the story of King Edward VIII’s choice to abdicate the throne to pursue a love affair with American divorcée Wallis Simpson. Madonna and Keshishian employ a framing device that has a modern-day woman (Abbie Cornish) discovering that the reality of the renowned romance doesn’t match up with her fantasy version. But Madonna fails to convey her own fascination with Edward and Wallis, outside of some vague personal connection to the details of worldwide fame and pervasive dissatisfaction. Mostly, she seems to have made a movie that has a lot on its mind and no coherent way to express it. The DVD and Blu-ray come with a making-of featurette. Available on VOD on May 1

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-- Noel Murray

Photo: Uma Thurman and Robert Pattinson in "Bel Ami." Credit: Magnolia Pictures.


Robert Pattinson: I loved playing a player in ‘Bel Ami’

February 17, 2012 | 11:31 am

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A corrupt government –- supported by a corrupt media –- that seeks to invade an Arab country for its resources is how Declan Donnellan described his film adaptation of the 1885 Guy de Maupassant novel “Bel Ami,” which focuses on France’s complex relationship with Morocco.

But Donnellan and collaborator Nick Ormerod’s movie, which  premieres Friday at the Berlin Film Festival, will get attention for a less geopolitical reason: It stars Robert Pattinson.

“The Twilight Saga” actor plays the lead character, Georges Duroy, who smarms and charms his way out of poverty and through the drawing rooms and bedrooms of the power-couples in 1890s Paris.  

In the film, Duroy is pulled out of squalor by Charles Forestier (Philip Glenister), a fellow former  soldier who has become a big-shot political editor.  But, as Forestier's smart and beautiful wife Madeleine (Uma Thurman) tells him, the most important people in Paris aren't these men but their wives.   The handsome Duroy enchants every female he meets, including the daughter of his mistress Clotilde (Christina Ricci), who gives him his nickname “Bel Ami.”  

The lazy Lothario later becomes boy toy to the brilliant and savvy Madeleine, who writes his articles and mingles with the politicians the newspaper has brought into power. When Bel Ami is insulted and dismissed by the paper's editor Rousset (Colm Meaney), he turns his attentions to the man's wife Virginie (Kristin Scott Thomas) and daughter Suzanne (Holliday Grainger). 

 At a press conference, Pattinson said he felt very motivated to play the morally dubious character. “When I first read it, I immediately related to just the idea that someone's energy wasn't about trying to achieve some kind of goal -– the only time he had any energy [was] when someone slighted him,”  Pattinson said.  “That's how I was a few years ago.  If someone insulted me, I'd get 10 years of ambition.”   (He said he'd grown out of that in the years since he first read the script.)

Pattinson, who next appears  in David Cronenberg's “Cosmopolis,”  said he’s sometimes thrown by the female fans who wait hours for him to arrive at a public appearance, as they did, in Berlin's frigid temperatures, on Friday. “It's strange having a pretty much single-sex audience a lot of a time.  But it's great -– they have been incredibly loyal.” 

When asked if he would consider appearing in a future “Twilight” movie if author Stephenie Meyer continued the franchise, he said, “Yeah, I mean, I'd be curious to see what Stephenie would write, but I just think I'd probably be too old by the time they did it.  I'm already too old!” 

“Bel Ami’ is co-directed by Donnellan and Ormerod, a theater team that has worked with the Royal Shakespeare Company, the Royal National Theatre in London and Moscow's Bolshoi Ballet; this is their feature film debut.  “The part's somebody the opposite of Rob,” Donnellan said of his lead actor.  “Bel Ami,” he explained, “is about somebody who has very little talent, who gets to the top on no talent, and it's a great parable for our times.”    

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 -- Susan Stone in Berlin

Photo: Robert Pattinson in "Bel Ami." Credit: Berlin Film Festival


'Water for Elephants' lawsuit is dismissed

December 1, 2011 |  5:29 pm

A suit against the trainers for the elephant in Water for Elephants has been dropped

Shortly after the Robert Pattinson-Reese Witherspoon film  "Water for Elephants" hit theaters in April, a dark cloud appeared over the delicate period romance.

A video purporting to show the film's elephant star, Tai, being trained with electric shock devices and bull hooks began to circulate. The footage was so disturbing that the animal-protection group Animal Defenders International -- which released the surreptitiously recorded video -- had two of its members file a lawsuit against Tai's owners, the Perris, Calif.-based Have Trunk Will Travel.

On Tuesday, a federal judge dismissed the lawsuit, in which the ADI members, Gail Profant and Leslie Hemstreet, said they purchased tickets to the 20th Century Fox film believing that its animal star had been treated humanely. While the judge did not rule on the facts of how Tai was treated, he said the plaintiffs could not continue with the litigation because they did not allege that "any portion" of the ticket price benefitted Have Trunk Will Travel.

In a statement, Have Trunk Will Travel owners Gary and Kari Johnson said that while they were "thrilled with the result," they still found that having to "defend against these types of allegations is disheartening, especially when the publicity from the movie drew such strong support for elephant conservation and research projects."

After receiving word of the ruling Thursday, Animal Defenders International said its attorneys and the plaintiffs were "reviewing their options." Fox had no comment on the judge's decision. 

In an interview with The Times last year, Witherspoon said she grew so close to Tai on set that she wept on the final day of production.

"The day I had to say goodbye to her, I wept all day," she recalled. "You work with actors and directors, but to have this nonverbal complete relationship with an animal that we were all very connected to was very magical."

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-- Amy Kaufman

twitter.com/AmyKinLA

Photo: Robert Pattinson with Tai the elephant in a scene from "Water for Elephants." Credit: 20th Century Fox


'Breaking Dawn': Robert Pattinson cheers 'Twilight' director Bill Condon

November 21, 2011 | 12:54 pm

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Reviews for "The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn -- Part 1" might have been, well, mixed, to put it kindly -- as of Sunday evening, the movie had a 29% fresh rating on the website Rotten Tomatoes. But the film's director, Bill Condon, has at least one very prominent supporter: the movie's star Robert Pattinson.

The 25-year-old English actor, who plays Edward Cullen in the series, had nothing but kind words for Condon, the fourth director to sign on for a "Twilight" film and the man who will conclude the saga next year when "Breaking Dawn -- Part 2" is released. He said he appreciated what the filmmaker was up against: a tonally challenging narrative, a special-effects-intensive production and pressure to meet outsize fan expectations for the first half of the finale of the franchise adapted from author Stephenie Meyer's bestselling vampire romance novels.

"It was a massive undertaking, much bigger budgets and huge expectations, since it was the last one in the series," Pattinson said of the production. "There was much more pressure than the last one."

Pattinson said he felt that Condon had a point of view with the film -- Condon told The Times that he wanted to marry melodrama and horror in telling the story of Edward's marriage to Bella (Kristen Stewart) and the fallout from the unplanned pregnancy that happens soon after. The actor also enjoyed Condon's humor, which showed up both on-screen and off. 

"It's very easy to become cynical about stuff, especially where you are doing five movies in the series," Pattinson said. "It's a very sentimental story in a lot of ways, and I'm an incredibly cynical person. Bill would always have a great explanation for why it's not ridiculous and it's not corny. It was great to have someone on set who could convince me of those things."

Pattinson said that from the beginning, the shoot was a challenge. The six-month filming schedule for both parts of "Breaking Dawn" kicked off in Brazil, where Pattinson said "everything went wrong."

"Just the fact that he didn't get overwhelmed within two seconds was a big deal," Pattinson said of Condon. "We were in Rio [de Janeiro] for one day. Two cameras broke down, a crane broke down and everything was crazy. There was no crowd control, and he stayed perfectly calm. Bill was really thrown in the deep end, and we came up with really nice stuff. It was really pretty and nice."

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-- Nicole Sperling

Photo: Bill Condon is flanked by Robert Pattinson, left, and Taylor Lautner at the Barcelona, Spain,  premiere of "The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn -- Part 1." Credit: Job Vermeulen/Associated Press


'Twilight: Breaking Dawn:' Does it send the wrong message?

November 21, 2011 |  7:00 am

 

Kristen Stewart's and Robert Pattinson's "Twilight: Breaking Dawn -- Part 1" carries an antiabortion message, say some feminist critics
It was of course never much of a question whether millions of Americans were going to rush out to see "The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn -- Part 1" this weekend, which they did -- about 18 million people, to be specific. For comparison's sake, that's just slightly behind the number who watched last year's "American Idol" finale -- as studio Summit Entertainment rang up $139.5 million in box office for the latest Kristen Stewart-Robert Pattinson film.

The bigger question, though, might be what these millions were left thinking after they left the theater, particularly in the areas of sex, love and childbirth, areas in which the Bill Condon-directed, Melissa Rosenberg-penned script has plenty to say.
 
A quick recap, in the unlikely event there isn't a Twihard in or around you. In this fourth installment of the vampire film franchise, adapted from about half of Stephenie Meyer's final book in the “Twilight” series, Bella Swan (Stewart) and the vampire Edward Cullen (Pattinson) finally consummate their love. Though still a teenager, she marries Edward in a glittery affair while the shape-shifting werewolf Jacob (Taylor Lautner) hovers nearby. The wedding leads to a surprise honeymoon in Brazil as well as to Bella's deflowering (not to mention de-feathering; vampire men and pillows are apparently a dangerous combination).

Most conspicuously, the wedding-night sex results in Bella becoming pregnant with a kind of human-vampire hybrid, which soon threatens the life of its mother. Told of the danger, Bella doesn't even consider terminating the pregnancy.

Continue reading »

'Breaking Dawn': Kristen Stewart's extreme 'Twilight' transformation

November 20, 2011 |  4:17 pm

Kristen Stewart and Robert Pattinson in "The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn — Part 1"

The fans who lined up over the weekend to see "The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn — Part 1" — and there were a lot of them, considering that the fourth installment in the franchise adapted from Stephenie Meyer's bestselling young-adult novels raked in an estimated $139.5 million — witnessed some pretty radical upheaval in the lives of young Bella Swan (Kristen Stewart) and her vampire beau Edward Cullen (Robert Pattinson).

The couple marries, and during a romantic honeymoon getaway, they finally consummate their relationship. But Bella unexpectedly becomes pregnant and fights to carry the child to term, though the fetus is seemingly incompatible with her body.

To depict the great physical toll the pregnancy takes on Bella's body — she's unable to eat and essentially is withering away as her stomach swells — the "Breaking Dawn" filmmakers looked to Lola Visual Effects, the company responsible for downsizing muscular Chris Evans to a pre-transformation weakling in this summer's comic book superhero film "Captain America." The results are certainly eyebrow-raising, with Bella becoming increasingly pale and extremely gaunt. 

"The idea was to leave you with a question mark about how they did it," said the film's director, Bill Condon. "We wanted you to think it was possible that Kristen actually lost a lot of weight for it."

The visual-effects team added prosthetics to Stewart's face (a process that took three hours of application) to make her eyes look more sunken and her ears larger. Stewart likened wearing the prosthetics to having a "big, skinny head" for the scenes. Still, the 21-year old actress was game for the transformation.

"I'm so happy that they were not afraid of it — to have your main character look so awful for half of the movie is a bold choice for a huge film," Stewart said. "It was the one thing I wasn't fully responsible for concerning Bella and it made me really nervous. I didn't know what it would look like until I saw the movie."

RELATED:

'Breaking Dawn' with 'Twilight' director Bill Condon

'Breaking Dawn--Part 1' review: Vampire tale is lifeless

— Nicole Sperling

Photo: Kristen Stewart and Robert Pattinson as Bella and Edward in 'The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn — Part 1'

Credit: Summit Entertainment


'Breaking Dawn': Twihards gather to watch Bella and Edward wed

November 18, 2011 | 11:34 am

Robert Pattinson and Kristen Stewart in 'Breaking Dawn - Part 1'

"The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn – Part 1” grossed $30.3 million from midnight showings early Friday morning according to an estimate from distributor Summit Entertainment, and it appears to be on pace to have the biggest opening yet for any movie in the vampire franchise adapted from author Stephenie Meyer's bestselling novels.

24 Frames checked in with some fans who came out for the movie’s first screenings at the Rave Motion Pictures 18, which showed the vampire flick on five screens at 12:01 a.m., with one additional showing at 12:45 a.m. Many people at the theater were continuing a tradition of seeing each installment at midnight that dated back to the 2009 debut of the second "Twilight" movie, “New Moon.”

“We’ve been doing it for two or three years. You wait all year to watch it, so you might as well come and see it at midnight,” said Alejandra Toribio, 21, of Long Beach.

“I feel like the movie’s always better when you see it before it’s really out,” said Liz Hook, 14, of Westchester, who came to the movie in her pajamas with her twin sister and a friend.

The audience was by far mostly female, but there were a few men on hand to support their friends and some fathers bringing young daughters to watch Bella Swan (Kristen Stewart) marry her undead beau Edward Cullen (Robert Pattinson), despite the protestations of her best friend, werewolf Jacob Black (Taylor Lautner).

“I’m not a fan. I’m just here to support my friends. I’m just dragged along,” said Jay Rice, 24, of Gardena.

His friend Yontique McHenry, 21, of Harbor City said to him, “People are gonna see this [article], and they’re gonna beat you up because you’re a fake fan. And you have a seat!”

“Go 'Twilight,' ” he responded, flashing a thumbs-up.

There were the occasional guys who considered themselves true fans, though, including 25-year-old Alexander Solis of South Gate, who donned a “Twilight” sweatshirt and T-shirt for the event. So what’s his answer to the great “Twilight” debate?

“Team Edward. Because he will be marrying Bella!” said Solis, who bought his ticket for the movie a month ago.

Favorite characters varied from Jacob (“I don’t find Edward attractive. He’s too pale,” said Rosario Carrera, 31, of Orange County) to Jasper, a vampire played by Jackson Rathbone.

“I’m Team Jasper. I think he’s funny-looking. In the film he’s all crazy-eyed,” Hook said.

Melissa Nelson, 31, of Torrance, said she was eager to see how the movie depicted Bella's surprise pregnancy -- in the film, she and Edward conceive a child on their honeymoon, though carrying the baby to term threatens Bella's life -- because of how she was introduced to the series. Nelson said she watched the first movie on a portable DVD player while her cousin was in labor.

“I was her birthing partner… While we were waiting for the baby to come, we were like, ‘Might as well watch a movie,’ ” Nelson said. “I’m really interested to see the transformation of [Bella’s] body when she’s pregnant.”

Nelson came to see the movie with other adult friends, but on Saturday she plans to bring young cousins and her 4-year-old son –- who’s Team Jacob and “can recite the movies for you” she said -– after she makes “sure it’s child appropriate” at the midnight screening. “He asked today, ‘Well, when am I going to see ‘Twilight’? Cause you know the new one is out today and we have to go see it,’ ” Nelson explained.

She said her husband scoffs at the series. “He says they’re fake vampires. He’s like, ‘How do they walk around in the daylight?’ ”

As for the franchise's enduring popularity, most fans chalked it up to the sweeping romance of the supernatural tale.

“It’s ‘Romeo and Juliet’ for now,” said Dawn Fagenson, 45, of Brentwood, who owns a cardboard cutout of Lautner as Jacob and has traveled to Forks, Wash., where the series takes place.

“It’s a very classic story,” said Jennifer Daskevich, 43, of Westchester. “They’ve done really well with marketing to younger people. We don’t really fit into that category, but they’ve done a really good job of casting young, dynamic people. It’s a great love story.”

A number of moviegoers cited their awe for the “great love story," but there were a few who were more cynical. Liz Hook’s sister, Joans, discovered the series when she was in fifth grade and “was really into them” upon the first read.

“And then after I read them, I was like, ‘Why did I read these? These are really stupid,’ ” she said. “Bella’s so desperate. She needs a man in her life, otherwise she cannot function. So I really hate the point of it, but it’s just fun to go [to the movies] with your friends.”

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–- Emily Rome

Photo: Robert Pattinson, left, and Kristen Stewart in "The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn - Part 1." Credit: Andrew Cooper / Summit Entertainment


People's Choice Awards nominations 2012

November 8, 2011 |  2:57 pm

Julia Roberts and Tom Hanks are among the 2012 People's Choice nominees
Moviegoers weren't interested in shelling out their hard-earned money to see Julia Roberts and Tom Hanks in "Larry Crowne" at the box office over the summer.

But judging by today's People's Choice Awards nominations, the two are still some of the most popular stars in the country. Both Roberts and Hanks secured nods for the 2012 ceremony, whose winners will be voted upon by the public. Also among the actors and actresses selected as fan favorites were Johnny Depp, Jennifer Aniston, Daniel Radcliffe and Robert Pattinson.

There was, predictably, much love for both the "Twilight" and "Harry Potter" franchises: "Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows — Part 2" was nominated as movie of the year, favorite action movie, favorite book adaptation and favorite ensemble movie cast; Daniel Radcliffe, Emma Watson, Rupert Grint and Tom Felton were all deemed some of the most popular stars younger than 25; Taylor Lautner, meanwhile, earned a nod for favorite action star.

PHOTOS: 2012 People's Choice Awards nominees

Those who want to vote for their favorite stars can do so at PeoplesChoice.com until Dec. 6; winners will be announced during the telecast on Jan. 11. 

A full list of nominees follows.

Continue reading »

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