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Category: Kirsten Dunst

Kristen Stewart in 'On the Road': 'I just want ... a baby' [video]

May 23, 2012 |  3:19 pm

 

"On the Road," Walter Salles' adaptation of the Jack Kerouac novel, premiered at the Cannes Film Festival on Wednesday. It's a lyrical tone poem about the adventures of Kerouac alter ego Sal Paradise, his best friend and inspiration, Dean Moriarty (based on the legendary Neal Cassady, who went on to drive the Magic Bus for Ken Kesey), and Moriarty's wife, Marylou. Here's a look at two clips from the movie, which is scheduled to be released in the U.S. in late fall.

"On the Road" more than captures the purity of that long-ago quest, using youthful stars like Sam Riley as Sal, Garrett Hedlund as Dean and Kristen Stewart as Marylou to show how eternal that yearning remains.

In the first clip, above, Sal, Dean and Marylou are driving. Marylou is at the wheel, musing about Dean leaving her while simultaneously coming onto Sal and talking about going back to her fiance. "I just want a house, a baby, something normal," she says.

The second clip, below, features Kirsten Dunst, who plays Camille, Dean's ex, with whom he has an on-again, off-again relationship. 

"On the Road" is also notable for the top-flight talent in cameo roles, including Amy Adams, Terrence Howard and Steve Buscemi, all motivated, Salles says, by passion for the source material. Viggo Mortensen, who plays Old Bull Lee (based on William S. Burroughs), showed up on the set with a gun and a typewriter.

 

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— Kenneth Turan and Julie Makinen


'On the Road' adaptation gets distribution from IFC, Sundance

May 8, 2012 |  8:10 pm

On the Road
Completing a journey that began in 1978, when filmmaker Francis Ford Coppola bought the rights to Jack Kerouac's classic 1957 Beat novel, "On the Road" is finally headed to U.S. theaters. On Tuesday, AMC Networks announced its acquisition of U.S. rights to the film, which will be jointly distributed by its IFC Films and Sundance Selects labels in the fall.

"On the Road" is directed by the Brazilian filmmaker Walter Salles, a road-film veteran who helmed "The Motorcycle Diaries," with Coppola serving as executive producer. It stars Sam Riley ("Brighton Rock") as the young writer Sal Paradise and Garrett Hedlund ("Tron: Legacy") as his free-spirited friend Dean Moriarty; Paradise and Moriarty are thinly veiled counterparts of Kerouac and pal Neal Cassady in the largely autobiographical story of cross-country road-tripping.

"Twilight" star Kristen Stewart, Kirsten Dunst (a frequent collaborator with Coppola's daughter, Sofia), Amy Adams ("The Muppets") and Viggo Mortensen ("A Dangerous Method") round out the cast.

Despite the presence of young stars such as Stewart and Dunst, as well as the attachment of a big name like Coppola, "On the Road's" landing at IFC and Sundance could lower expectations for the film's performance, as neither label is known for setting the box office on fire. According to Box Office Mojo, only three IFC or Sundance films have ever surpassed $5 million in total gross: "My Big Fat Greek Wedding," "Y Tu Mama Tambien" and "Cave of Forogtten Dreams."

In a prepared statement, Jonathan Sehring, president of Sundance Selects and IFC Films, said they would put "all our resources together to make this theatrical release into a significant cultural event."

"On the Road" will make its world premiere at the Cannes Film Festival in the competition section. The festival runs May 16-27.

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— Oliver Gettell

Photo: Sam Riley, left, Kristen Stewart and Garrett Hedlund in "On the Road." Credit: Gregory Smith / MK2


Sundance 2012: 'Bachelorette,' (sort of) like 'Bridesmaids'

January 24, 2012 |  1:29 am

 

Sundance Film Festival title "Bachelorette," which has been compared to "Bridesmaids," stars Isla Fisher and Kirsten Dunst

The principals behind the new female comedy "Bachelorette" have gone to some lengths to differentiate themselves from "Bridesmaids"; writer-director Leslye Headland even recently released a statement explaining the movies' fundamental differences.

When her film premiered Monday night at the Sundance fIlm Festival, it was easy to see why such a statement might have been necessary. The glossy comedy, produced by Will Ferrell, shares plenty of similarities with the Kristen Wiig hit: The Headland movie is also a raunch-filled romp, built around comedic set pieces, in which a group of close female friends come to love, hate and ultimately understand each other in the run-up to a wedding.

The queen bee (and yes, there are some "Mean Girls" parallels) is Regan (Kirsten Dunst) who, with best friends Katie (Isla Fisher, in the ditz role) and wild child Gena (Lizzy Caplan) are thrown for a loop when their generally mocked, overweight high-school classmate Becky (Rebel Wilson, in case you weren't already thinking of "Bridesmaids") becomes engaged to a man they all covet, leading them to question their own flawed lives.

PHOTOS: The scene at Sundance

Barbed insults, drug-fueled partying and, yes, even wedding-dress mishaps ensue when the three come together the night before the ceremony. (A pack of groomsmen is led by James Marsden and Adam Scott, who has his own bit of history with one of the women.) The setting and the emotional dynamics have plenty in common with "Bridesmaids," and there's even another call-back here to a forgotten '90s anthem -- The Proclaimers' "500 Miles" stands in for Wilson Phillips' "Hold On."

There are some key differences. The girls are nearly all at least a decade younger and more free-spirited, none of them are married and the goal in at least one case is to get back with a high-school sweetheart, not land a mature thirtysomething. The partying and social situations -- for much of the film, it's not easy to find a scene without drug use, a strip club or a sex scene -- are generally played more aggressively than "Bridesmaids." "I think it's more hard core," Caplan said on the red carpet before the screening. (The movie also goes to a surprisingly dramatic place in its last half-hour as the broad-ish comedy from the opening sections is all but forgotten.)

Headland, a playwright making her feature debut, would also be right to point out she started writing the script nearly four years ago and based it on an off-Broadway play she created, long before "Bridesmaids" was ever shot.

The director told 24 Frames before the festival she didn't mind the comparison as much as you might think: "I look at it a little like 'Bonnie & Clyde' in 1967," she said. "You have a movie that gets everyone's attention and all these comparisons are drawn, and they're not always right. But then it's like, 'Thank God, let's make more movies like that.'"

Still, whoever buys this film for U.S. distribution will need to worry about the comparison. No matter how much pundits like to talk about a "Bridesmaids" wave, it will be difficult to market a movie like this without risking the "didn't Kristen Wiig just do something like that?" reaction; on paper, there are plenty of similarities. Those marketers may best be served by going the misanthropic route. As Caplan said on stage after the screening. "I saw [Headland's] play and was blown away by how dark and awful she was willing to make people."

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Sundance 2012: Spike Lee says studios "know nothing about black people"

-- Steven Zeitchik and Amy Kaufman in Park City, Utah
twitter.com/ZeitchikLAT
twitter.com/AmyKinLA

Photo: A scene from "Bachelorette." Credit: Sundance Film Festival


National Society of Film Critics: 'Melancholia' best of 2011

January 7, 2012 |  1:51 pm

 

Kirsten Dunst, from left,  Alexander Skarsgaard, Kiefer Sutherland and Charlotte Gainsbourg  in "Melancholia."

The National Society of Film Critics, which is made up of 58 the country's major film critics, rarely agrees with the choices of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences for the Oscars. And the group probably stayed true to form with its picks for its 46th annual awards, naming Lars Von Trier's end-of-the-world drama "Melancholia" best picture Saturday.

Terrence's Malick's "The Tree of Life" came in second and the lauded Iranian drama "A Separation" placed third. "Separation" also won best foreign-language film and best screenplay for Asghar Farhadi.

Malick took best director honors with Martin Scorsese for "Hugo" coming in second and Von Trier placing third.

The annual voting, using a weighted ballot system, is held at Sardi's Restaurant in New York City; this year 48 of the 58 members participated.

Best actor went to Brad Pitt for both "Moneyball" and "The Tree of Life." Pitt also won best actor from the New York Film Critics' Circle and is nominated for a Golden Globe, a SAG award and a Critics Choice award. Runner-up was Gary Oldman for "Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy," and Jean Dujardin placed third for "The Artist."

Notably missing from the list was Michael Fassbender for "Shame" and George Clooney for "The Descendants."

Best actress honors went to Kirsten Dunst for "Melancholia," with Yun Jung-hee for the Korean film "Poetry" coming in second. Meryl Streep's turn in "The Iron Lady" placed third.

Best supporting actor went to Albert Brooks for a his dramatic turn in "Drive." Christopher Plummer placed second for "Beginners," followed by Patton Oswalt for "Young Adult."

Best supporting actress was given to Jessica Chastain for her roles in three films: "The Tree of Life," "Take Shelter" and "The Help." Jeannie Berlin came in second for "Margaret" and Shailene Woodley placed third for "The Descandants."

"Tree of Life" also took home best cinematography for Emanual Lubezki with Manual Alberto Claro placing second for "Melancholia" and Robert Richardson taking third for "Hugo."

Werner Herzog's "Cave of Forgotten Dreams" was best nonfiction film. He also came in third place in the category for "Into the Abyss." Steve James' "The Interrupters" placed second.

In best screenplay category, Steve Zaillian and Aaron Sorkin's script for "Moneyball" was second behind "A Separation" and Woody Allen's "Midnight in Paris" took third.

 The Experimental Award went to Ken Jacobs for "Seeking the Monkey King."

There were also several Film Heritage honors given out:

-- BAM Cinematek for its complete Vincente Minnelli retrospective, with all titles shown in 16mm or 35mm.

-- Lobster Films, Groupama Gan Foundation for Cinema and the Technicolor Foundation for Cinema for the restoration of the color version of Georges Melies' "A Trip to the Moon."

-- New York's Museum of Modern Art for its extensive retrospective of Weimar Cinema.

-- Flicker Alley for its box set "Landmarks of Early Soviet Film."

-- Criterion Collection for its two-disc DVD package, "The Complete Jean Vigo."

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-- Susan King

Photo: Kirsten Dunst, from left,  Alexander Skarsgaard, Kiefer Sutherland and Charlotte Gainsbourg star in "Melancholia." Credit: Christian Geisnaes/Magnolia Pictures.

 


L.A. Film Critics choose best actor, best actress winners

December 11, 2011 |  1:30 pm

Fassbender shame
The L.A. Film Critics Assn. is handing out its annual awards today. They've named their best actor and actress -- Michael Fassbender and Yun Jung-hee, along with several other awards. Here's the list so far.

Best actor: Michael Fassbender, for his work in "A Dangerous Method," "Jane Eyre," "Shame" and "X-Men: First Class."

Runner-Up: Michael Shannon, "Take Shelter."

Best Actress: Yun Jung-hee, in the South Korean film "Poetry."

Runner-up: Kirsten Dunst, "Melancholia."

Best Documentary/Nonfiction film: "Cave of Forgotten Dreams" by Werner Herzog.

Runner-Up: "The Arbor" by Clio Barnard.

Best screenplay: Asghar Farhadi, “A Separation.”

Runner-Up: Alexander Payne, Nat Faxon, Jim Rash, “The Descendants.”

Best supporting actress: Jessica Chastain, who was recognized for her work in six films -- "Coriolanus," "The Debt," "The Help," "Take Shelter," "Texas Killing Fields" and "The Tree of Life."

Runner-up: Janet McTeer, "Albert Nobbs."

Best supporting actor: Christopher Plummer, "Beginners."

Runner-up: Patton Oswalt, "Young Adult."

Best cinematography: Emmanuel Lubezki, "The Tree of Life."

Runner-up: Cao Yu, "City of Life and Death."

Best music/score: The Chemical Brothers, "Hanna."

Runner-up: Cliff Martinez, "Drive."

Best production design: Dante Ferretti, "Hugo."

Runner-up: Maria Djurkovic, "Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy."

Best Independent, Experimental: "Spark of Being." Directed by Bill Morrison, it's a re-imagining of Mary Shelley's "Frankenstein,: using images culled from archives around the world.

RELATED

National Board of Review names 'Hugo' best picture

New York critics name 'The Artist' best film of the year

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Photo: Writer-director Steve McQueen, left, and actor Michael Fassbender on the set of "Shame." Credit: Abbot Genser/ Fox Searchlight Pictures 
 


Young Hollywood: Evan Rachel Wood on the benefits of Twitter

November 14, 2011 | 11:28 am

Evan Rachel Wood talks about why she likes Twitter
On Twitter, plenty of celebrities are bombarded with hateful messages about their films or wardrobe choices. But Evan Rachel Wood has had a different experience on the social networking site: She's been sent an overwhelming number of adoring messages from fans.

"I can be really critical, and you hear the bad stuff more than the good and then all of a sudden, there's all of these people every day who are like, 'I love you, and you're so inspirational,'" the 24-year-old said at the Los Angeles Times' Young Hollywood round table earlier this month, where she sat alongside Anton Yelchin, Armie Hammer and Kirsten Dunst. "It's nice to actually hear some of the good things sometimes."

None of the other young stars at the event has a Twitter account, although Hammer admitted he once attempted to send out a message on his wife's feed.

"In the middle of writing this thing, the letters on the keyboard just stopped working," he explained. "I was like, 'Why is this not typing anymore? 140 characters? That's it? Are you joking me?' It's hard to get a good joke out in 140 characters."

For more on the actors' feelings about tweeting, check out the clip below.

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-- Amy Kaufman

twitter.com/AmyKinLA

Photo: Evan Rachel Wood poses on the red carpet after the second annual Los Angeles Times Young Hollywood roundtable. Credit: Matt Sayles / Associated Press


Young Hollywood: Mel Gibson 'intense human being,' Yelchin says

November 11, 2011 |  3:21 pm

Anton Yelchin talks about Mel Gibson at the LA Times Young Hollywood panel

When Anton Yelchin began working on "The Beaver," he knew his costar Mel Gibson had quite a lot going on in his personal life. But the 22-year-old said the various media reports about Gibson's non-work behavior never affected their relationship on set.

"I judge people on how they are at work and how they are to me at work, and he was lovely," Yelchin said last week at the Los Angeles Times' second annual Young Hollywood roundtable, which also featured Armie Hammer, Evan Rachel Wood and Kirsten Dunst.

Still, Yelchin admitted, he found Gibson to be an "intense human being."

"We had some really amazing rehearsals with him ... where he would just talk and we would sort of be in character and it would just make me weep because he's got a lot going on inside," the actor said. "When someone shares that with you in really close proximity, it's very affecting."

There's more on Gibson in the clip below. Check back with 24 Frames this week, as we'll continue to post short videos with additional highlights from the conversation.

 

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-- Amy Kaufman

twitter.com/AmyKinLA

Photo: Anton Yelchin poses on the red carpet after the Los Angeles Times Young Hollywood roundtable. Credit: Matt Sayles / Associated Press


Young Hollywood: Armie Hammer on working with Clint Eastwood

November 10, 2011 |  1:25 pm

Evan Rachel Wood talks about working with Woody Allen at the LA Times Young Hollywood roundtable

When Evan Rachel Wood showed up to her first day on the set of "Whatever Works," she wasn't sure if she'd be out of a job in a few hours.

After all, she had yet to meet director Woody Allen -- he cast her simply because he felt she was right for the part in his 2009 film. And she'd heard stories about the legendary filmmaker quickly firing actors when he realized they weren't right for certain parts.

"People will show up and do the scene and he'll be like, 'You know what, this isn't right.' And he'll just recast. So the first day I was, like, so, so scared," the actress admitted on Friday at the Los Angeles Times' Young Hollywood roundtable, which also included Armie Hammer, Kirsten Dunst and Anton Yelchin.

Hammer also admitted being terrified before working with a different iconic director -- Clint Eastwood. The actor began work on Eastwood's "J. Edgar" immediately after wrapping "The Social Network" with David Fincher and said the two filmmakers employ completely different styles of directing.

"With Fincher, he would spend 20 minutes making sure that the angle of your head was right when you shot a scene," Hammer said. "But with Clint, you walk into a room and he goes, 'OK, so put it on its feet.' ...' And you're like, 'Oh, so it's up to me? Uh, OK.' "

For more on how the young stars approached working with A-list directors, watch the clip below. Check back with 24 Frames this week as we continue to post short videos with additional highlights from the conversation.

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-- Amy Kaufman

twitter.com/AmyKinLA

Photo: Evan Rachel Wood and Henry Cavill are directed by Woody Allen, right, in "Whatever Works." Credit: Jessica Miglio / Sony Pictures Classics


Young Hollywood: Kirsten Dunst, Armie Hammer talk role preparation

November 9, 2011 | 12:58 pm

Armie Hammer and Kirsten Dunst at the Young Hollywood roundtable
When Armie Hammer showed up his first day of work on "J. Edgar" -- where he would be directed by Clint Eastwood and acting alongside Leonardo DiCaprio -- he wanted to make sure he was prepared.

So weeks before production began, the actor hired a researcher to help him dig up as much material as possible on his character, Clyde Tolson, who was J. Edgar Hoover's rumored lover. What he ended up with was a wealth of source material: more than 6,000 pages of research and thousands of photographs.

"At 25, that was a world that I will never know and I will never understand it because it's so drastically different than how we are raised and how we exist now," he said Friday at the Los Angeles Times' second annual Young Hollywood panel at AFI Fest, which also included Kirsten Dunst, Anton Yelchin and Evan Rachel Wood. "So that's really why I felt I had to do the research, because if I played this as a modern dude, I'd be the idiot who looked stupid next to Leonardo DiCaprio and Judi Dench and Naomi Watts, and I did not want that to happen."

Dunst seemed surprised by Hammer's level of preparation, admitting that she feels it's the "director's job" to help actors with research. While working on "Melancholia" with Lars von Trier, she said, the filmmaker used his own experiences to help the actress understand her character's depression.

"With Lars, he writes from a very personal place. So he talked to me a lot about his depression and some of the films in the film are actually scenes that he's experienced in real life," she said. "For him to be so vulnerable and open with me about that just made me very comfortable to feel free in whatever I was doing on the set."

There's more on how the young performers prepped for their recent roles in the clip below. Check back with 24 Frames this week, as we'll continue to post short videos with additional highlights from the conversation.

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-- Amy Kaufman

twitter.com/AmyKinLA

Photo: Armie Hammer and Kirsten Dunst at the L.A. Times Young Hollywood roundtable. Credit: David Livingston / Getty Images


Young Hollywood: Hammer, Yelchin, Wood, Dunst on getting their starts

November 8, 2011 | 11:14 am

Anton Yelchin, Evan Rachel Wood, Armie Hammer and Kirsten Dunst at the 2nd annual LA Times Young Hollywood panel
Three members of this year's Young Hollywood roundtable -- Kirsten Dunst, Evan Rachel Wood and Anton Yelchin -- all began acting when they were kids. But Armie Hammer began auditioning only a few years ago, and he got his first big break last year playing the Winkelvoss twins in "The Social Network."

On Friday night, at the Los Angeles Times' second-annual discussion, Hammer said he was first inspired to act after watching Macaulay Culkin's performance in "Home Alone." But his "good, responsible parents" wouldn't let him try his hand at a career until he got older, he said.

"What are you trying to say, dude?" joked Wood, who revealed that she had been up for Dunst's part in "Interview With the Vampire" at the tender age of 5.

"I'm just saying that I know I experienced things in this business when I got into it at age 18, that if I was 12 having to deal with it, it would have crushed my soul," Hammer said, trying to defend his comment.

Eventually, the actor defied his parents' wishes. He dropped out of high school -- and later college -- to try his hand at acting. To hear more about Hammer's career trajectory, check out this clip from the event. Check back with 24 Frames this week, as we'll continue to post short videos with additional highlights from the conversation.

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Young Hollywood: Yelchin, Wood, Hammer, Dunst on making it big

-- Amy Kaufman

twitter.com/AmyKinLA

Photo, from left: Anton Yelchin, Evan Rachel Wood, Armie Hammer and Kirsten Dunst at the second-annual Los Angeles Times Young Hollywood roundtable. Credit: David Livingston / Getty Images


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