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Category: BAFTA Awards

Oscar Senti-meter: A BAFTA bounce for Dujardin, Oldman, Streep

February 20, 2012 |  5:17 pm

Sentimeter 2-12
Trying to predict winners at the Academy Awards can be like trying to read tea leaves, but thanks to tools like The Times’ Oscar Senti-meter, which analyzes Oscar-related buzz on Twitter, we can bring a bit of “Moneyball”-like analysis to the process.

Examining tweets captured by the Senti-meter in the wake of the British Academy of Film and Television Arts awards, held Feb. 12 in London, shows that BAFTA-watching Twitter users had a lot to say about silent-film star Jean Dujardin (“The Artist”), hometown hero Gary Oldman (“Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy”) and perennial favorite Meryl Streep (“The Iron Lady”).

The Senti-meter is an interactive tool developed by The Times, IBM and the USC Annenberg Innovation Lab that analyzes opinions about the Academy Awards race by combing through and cataloging a high volume of tweets each day. It uses language-recognition technology to gauge positive, negative and neutral opinions shared in the messages, and it also tracks the number of tweets.

Take, for example, “The Artist,” which is nominated for 10 Oscars and won best picture, director, screenplay and lead actor at the BAFTAs: In the three days leading up to the British awards, “The Artist” was mentioned in 1,253, 1,331 and 1,166 tweets, a daily average of 1,250 tweets. On Feb. 12, the day of the BAFTAs, the Twitterverse exploded with 10,296 tweets about the film, a more than eight-fold increase.

The high volume consisted largely of congratulatory and celebratory tweets, such as “The Artist Best Film !!! #BAFTA ! :D #Proud” and “Fantastic that The Artist did so well. Wonderful, charming film.”

Dujardin, the French leading man of “The Artist,” also received a BAFTA bump after he won the award for lead actor. Dujardin averaged about 454 tweets per day from Feb. 9-11, but shot up to 2,330 on Feb. 12, an increase of more than five times.

One Dujardin fan put it this way: “So happy Jean Dujardin wins BAFTA. Just one more to go ... two weeks tonight #Oscar.”

Dujardin also received some Twitter buzz after guest appearances on “Saturday Night Live,” reprising his silent-star persona, and on the website Funny or Die, humorously auditioning for a surfeit of stereotypical French bad-guy roles.

Among the actors Dujardin bested at the BAFTAs was Englishman Oldman, star of the thriller “Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy.” Oldman remains a long shot to win lead actor at the Oscars (his first-ever nomination), but perhaps he can take some consolation in having lots of fans on Twitter.

Averaging about 119 tweets per day going into the BAFTAs, Oldman shot up to 1,502 on Feb. 12, an increase of more than 12 times. One Oldman supporter (and Grammy hater) tweeted, “grammys can suck my toes, on the other hand the baftas was delightful S/O to Gary Oldman you was snubbed but still a winner and legend.”

Oldman’s movie also won awards for outstanding British film and adapted screenplay. Averaging 900 tweets over the previous three days, “Tinker Tailor” racked up 5,488 tweets the day of the awards, a more than six-fold increase. Positive sentiment for the film, which has occasionally been deemed boring and confusing by Twitter users, also edged upward.

One Twitter user wrote, “So glad Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy won Best British Film at #Baftas. It was brilliant, and should have gotten more Oscar nods.”

Meanwhile, BAFTA-winning actress Streep, who portrays former Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher in the biopic “The Iron Lady,” continued her reign as a favorite Twitter subject. From an average of 1,695 tweets per day captured by the Senti-meter leading up to the BAFTAs, Streep skyrocketed to 14,725 tweets upon winning the lead actress award, dwarfing any other actress (or actor, for that matter).

For comparison, “The Help” star Viola Davis, who is widely considered the other Oscar front-runner alongside Streep for lead actress, managed only 364 tweets the same day.

In the words of one Streep fan, “I love meryl Streep! Superb actress! Classy all round! So happy she won tonight! Bring on the Oscar.”

That said, neither the BAFTA awards nor the Twitterverse is a foolproof predictor of Oscar success; we’ll have to wait till Feb. 26 to be sure. Until then, though, we can see what all the talk is about.

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— Oliver Gettell


'The Artist' sweeps BAFTAs, winning best picture, director, actor

February 12, 2012 |  2:17 pm

The Artist swept the BAFTA Awards

This post has been corrected. See note at the bottom for details.

"The Artist," the mostly silent black-and-white film made by a French cast and crew, was named best picture of the year at the Orange British Academy Awards on Sunday.

The picture swept Britain's top film awards, taking home seven of the 12 awards it was up for, including a prize for Jean Dujardin as lead actor and two for director-writer Michel Hazanavicius. Dujardin was also recently named lead actor by the Screen Actors Guild, while Hazanavicius took home the Directors Guild of America's top prize last month.

After receiving honors from the British Academy of Film and Television Arts awards, it seems increasingly likely that both Frenchmen have a viable shot of scoring Oscar statuettes on Feb. 26.

The battle for lead actress is less clear, as Meryl Streep was given the BAFTA award for her portrayal of former Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher in "The Iron Lady." She beat out Viola Davis, who won the SAG award for her performance in "The Help," while Streep was named lead actress in a drama at the Golden Globes.

Meanwhile, two locks seem to be award season favorites -- Christopher Plummer and Octavia Spencer --  who received the BAFTA supporting actor and actress prizes. Plummer, 82, won for his role as an elderly gay man who reveals his sexuality to his son in "Beginners," while Spencer was recognized for her part as a fiesty maid in "The Help."

Other awards Sunday went to "Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy" for outstanding British film and to Pedro Almodóvar's "The Skin I Live In" for foreign-language picture. "Rango," featuring a lizard voiced by Johnny Depp, won for animated film.

Last year, eventual Oscar best picture winner "The King's Speech" took home the top prize at the BAFTAs, which took place at London's Royal Opera House.

Here's a full list of the BAFTA winners:

Continue reading »

DGA names 'The Artist's' Michel Hazanavicius best director

January 28, 2012 | 11:17 pm

Scorsese payne hazanavicius fincher dga

This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.

The Directors Guild of America on Saturday evening named Michel Hazanavicius best film director of 2011 for “The Artist,” the nostalgic black-and-white, nearly silent movie that hearkens back to the time of transition in Hollywood from silents to talkies. It is the first guild win for the 44-year-old French filmmaker.

"It's maybe the highest recognition I could hope. I really love directors, I over-respect directors. This is very moving and touching to me," he said, receiving a standing ovation. "Best director -- I really don't know what that means. All movies are different, so it's a strange thing to try to compare them and say which is best, but I'm very happy to get this. Thank you."

The other nominees were Martin Scorsese ("Hugo"), Woody Allen ("Midnight in Paris"), David Fincher ("The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo") and Alexander Payne ("The Descendants").

PHOTOS: Directors Guild of America Awards

The DGA feature film awards are considered one of the most dependable bellwethers for the Academy Awards for best director. Over the past 63 years, the DGA and academy have disagreed on their choices only six times. The last time was nine years ago when Rob Marshall won the DGA award for “Chicago” and Roman Polanski was named best director by the academy for “The Pianist.”

Hazanavicius had already been named best director by the New York Film Critics Circle and the Critics Choice Movie Awards. He was in contention for a Golden Globe and is nominated for a BAFTA and Independent Spirit Award for best director.

Last week, “The Artist” won the Producers Guild of America award, which is one of the indicators for the best film Oscar. On Tuesday, “The Artist” earned 10 Oscar nominations, one less than the top nominee “Hugo.” Hazanavicius is up for three of those Oscars for director, screenplay and editing.

The 64th annual DGA Awards were held at the Grand Ballroom at Hollywood and Highland. Recent Golden Globe winner Kelsey Grammer was the host of the evening, succeeding Carl Reiner, who had become an institution at the event, hosting 24 times. Reiner agreed to host for a final time at the 2011 ceremony.

"Welcome to what will be a glorious night....for some of you. Last year we celebrated the DGA awards of biblical length -- it was so long, the Mayans could not predict an end," he said. "The director's cut was two hours shorter. Even James Cameron said, 'it was too long.'"

Before being named the night's big winner, Hazanavicius was presented with his nominee medallion by his two stars, Berenice Bejo and Jean Dujardin. Upon taking it, he said: "It's a thrill to be here and to be among these wonderful directors. I'm honored," he said in accepting the medallion. "Maybe you haven't noticed but I'm French. I have an accent and I have a name that is very difficult to pronounce. I'm not American and I'm not French, actually. I'm a filmmaker. And I made a film about my love for Hollywood. We create stories that tell people they are not alone. We separate life from shadows. Hollywood helped me grow up. I believed in values like courage, perseverance and integrity."

"I made this film as a love letter to Hollywood. I feel like I am being accepted by you -- not you as Americans but as filmmakers. So thank you." And he added:  "For my wife Berenice, I'm so glad we shared this together and I love you."

The guild gave James Marsh the award for feature documentary for "Project Nim."

The DGA award for best directing in a TV comedy series went to Robert B. Weide, "Curb Your Enthusiasm" ("Palestinian Chicken").

In accepting, Weide said: "I have very mixed feelings about this because this means that I just lost a $300 bet to my wife, Linda. Why do they call this a medallion? It's a plate. I understand when you go to Don Mischer's house for dinner, you actually eat off of these."

Other awards handed out Saturday night:

Movies for Television and Mini-series: Jon Cassar, "The Kennedys"

Dramatic TV series: Patty Jenkins, for the pilot of "The Killing"

Musical variety TV: Glenn Weiss, for the 65th annual Tony Awards 

Reality TV programs: Neil P. Degroot, for "Biggest Loser"

Daytime TV serials: William Ludell, for "General Hospital" ("Intervention")

Children’s programs: Amy Schatz, for "A Child's Garden of Poetry" 

Commercials: Noam Murro

Three special awards were also presented. Ed Sherin was named an Honorary Life Member; Katy Garretson received the Frank Capra Achievement Award; and Dennis Mazzocco recieved the Franklin J. Schaffner Achievement Award.

[For the record, 5:30 p.m. Jan. 29: A previous version of this post misspelled the last name of "Project Nim" director James Marsh as March.]

RELATED:

Oscar nominations: Woody Allen, Martin Scorsese top list for best director

Oscar nominations: Who's been hottest so far this awards season?

'The Descendants' expands rapdily, 'The Artist' slowly

-- Jasmine Elist and Susan King

Photo: Directors Martin Scorsese, Alexander Payne, Michel Hazanavicius and David Fincher attend the 64th Annual Directors Guild Of America Awards Meet the Nominees Breakfast held at the DGA on Saturday.Credit: Photo by Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images for DGA 

  


'The Artist' dominates BAFTA nominations

January 17, 2012 | 12:35 am

Artists_cast_golden_globes
"The Artist," which won three Golden Globes on Sunday, received the most nominations early Tuesday for the Orange British Academy Awards with 12 nods including best film, original screenplay, director, actor and actress.

The British Academy of Film and Television Arts gave the espionage thriller "Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy" 11 nominations and Martin Scorsese's valentine to cinema, "Hugo," nine nominations.

Besides "The Artist," best film nominees are "The Descendants," which won the Globe Globe for best movie (drama), "The Help," "Drive" and "Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy."

Director nominees are Michel Hazanavicius for "The Artist"; Nicolas Winding Refn for "Drive," Scorsese for "Hugo," Tomas Alfredson for "Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy" and Lynne Ramsay for "We Need to Talk About Kevin."

Best actor nominees are Brad Pitt for "Moneyball"; Gary Oldman for "Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy"; George Clooney for "The Descendants"; Jean Dujardin for "The Artist" and Michael Fassbender for "Shame."

Vying for best actress are Berenice Bejo for "The Artist"; Meryl Streep for "The Iron Lady"; Michelle Williams for "My Week With Marilyn"; Tilda Swinton for "We Need to Talk About Kevin"; and Viola Davis for "The Help."

In contention for supporting actor are Christopher Plummer for "Beginners"; Jim Broadbent for "The Iron Lady"; Jonah Hill for "Moneyball"; Kenneth Branagh for "My Week With Marilyn"; and Philip Seymour Hoffman for "The Ides of March."

Nominees for supporting actress are Carey Mulligan for "Drive"; Jessica Chastain for "The Help"; Judi Dench for "My Week With Marilyn"; Melissa McCarthy for "Bridesmaids"; and Octavia Spencer for "The Help."

Notably missing from the best film list is "Hugo." And despite the strong showing for "Drive," Albert Brooks, who has received critical awards and a Golden Globe nomination for supporting actor, was shut out of the category for the BAFTAs.

Here's a full list of the BAFTA nominees:

Continue reading »

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