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Alex Proyas goes back to his roots

May 26, 2011 |  4:50 pm

EXCLUSIVE: Director Alex Proyas developed a cult following in the 1990s with such movies as “The Crow” and "Dark City,” merging mainstream action with an apocalyptic vision.

 Proyas' bigger studio efforts have been less widely acclaimed –- most recently, the Nicolas Cage thriller “Knowing." But fans hoping for the filmmaker's return to his roots could get just that, with Proyas signing on to produce and godfather a new project called “Future Perfect,” a film with echoes of “Hanna” and other father-daughter thrillers, according to two people familiar with the project who were not authorized to talk about it publicly.

The film has a conceit reminiscent of "Paper Moon": An older man and a young girl, both eugenically created assassins, must go on the run, in a dynamic that may or may not be that of a father and daughter. The Australia-based production, said one source, aims to use the "District 9" model of grouping a young director, a high-profile producer, independent financing and a location far from Hollywood to make a vision-driven film that looks bigger than its relatively modest price tag.

Shane Abbess, the director of the Australian spiritual action film “Gabriel" (he was also at one time  slated to direct “Source Code”) will helm the film. The script has been written by Brian McGreevy and Lee Shipman, the writers who are penning a reboot of “Zorro” as well as “Dracula.”

Interestingly, Proyas has a Dracula movie in development too, as well as a supernatural action film modeled on “Paradise Lost." He's done well by going small and scrappy, and "Future Perfect" certainly fits the definition.


With new movie, Zorro goes to the future

-- Steven Zeitchik


 Photo: Brandon Lee in Alex Proyas' "The Crow." Credit: Miramax

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"Dark City" is one of the most original films of the last quarter century. Would be happy to see more such work from Alex Proyas.

Whatever happened to Proyas' adaptation of The Tripods?


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