L.A. NOW

Southern California -- this just in

« Previous Post | L.A. NOW Home | Next Post »

Downtown L.A. intersection may be named 'Ray Bradbury Square'

September 12, 2012 |  9:59 am
PHOTOS: Ray Bradbury | 1920 - 2012

The Los Angeles City Council is considering a proposal to name the downtown intersection of Fifth and Flower street “Ray Bradbury Square” as a tribute to the late science fiction writer who called Los Angeles and its libraries home.

On Tuesday, the council was to consider a motion from Councilman Jose Huizar that would affix Bradbury’s name to the corner where the city’s Central Library sits. The item was continued to Sept. 18.

Bradbury, who died at the age of 91 in June, penned more than 27 novels and story collections. Most famous for "The Martian Chronicles," "Fahrenheit 451," "Dandelion Wine" and "Something Wicked This Way Comes," Bradbury has frequently been credited with elevating the often-maligned reputation of science fiction. Some say he single-handedly helped to move the genre into the realm of literature.

PHOTOS: Ray Bradbury | 1920 - 2012 

He was also a beloved figure in Los Angeles, where he was a regular at bookstore readings and an enthusiastic supporter of local theater and libraries.

Huizar’s motion said Bradbury had “a special connection to Downtown Los Angeles” adding that he “was known to do his writing on public typewriters in the Central Library.”

"In recognition of Ray Bradbury's remarkable career and service to the cultural life of the City, it is appropriate that the City honor his memory by naming the intersection of 5th Street and Flower Street as 'Ray Bradbury Square,' " the motion said.

ALSO:

UCLA history department gets $10-million donation

Researchers on Carmageddon II: 'You can't scare people away'

Lifeguards who made 'Gangnam' parody video want their jobs back

-- Matt Stevens and David Zahniser

Photo: Ray Bradbury in 1997. Credit: Steve Castillo / Associated Press

Bradbury died at the age of 91 in June of this year, after penning Author of more than 27 novels and story collections. Most famous for "The Martian Chronicles," "Fahrenheit 451," "Dandelion Wine" and "Something Wicked This Way Comes", Bradbury has frequently been credited with elevating the often-maligned reputation of science fiction. Some say he singlehandedly helped to move the genre into the realm of literature.

He also was a beloved figure in Los Angeles where he was a regular at bookstore readings and an enthusiastic supporter of local theater and libraries.

Huizar’s motion said Bradbury had “a special connection to Downtown Los Angeles” and “was known to do his writing on public typewriters in the Central Library.”

Los Angeles High School’s library is already named The Ray Bradbury Memorial Library, according to staff, and a plaque honoring him still hangs at the entrance. The author graduated  from Los Angeles High more than 70 years ago.  

ALSO:

 

--Matt Stevens and David Zahniser

 

Comments 

Advertisement










Video