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Football star Junior Seau death 'hurts,' Reggie Bush says

May 2, 2012 | 12:23 pm

Click for more photos of Junior Seau

The San Diego Chargers urged fans to pray after football star Junior Seau was found dead Wednesday of an apparent self-inflicted gunshot wound.

"Everyone at the Chargers is in complete shock and disbelief right now," the team said in a statement. "We ask everyone to stop what they're doing and send their prayers to Junior and his family.... The outpouring of emotion is no surprise."

Former USC football star Reggie Bush said on Twitter: "Damn this one hurts San Diego! One of the greatest to come from the city."

PHOTOS: Junior Seau | 1969 - 2012

Few details were immediately available. TV footage showed police swarming the Oceanside home in North San Diego County and people comforting each other.

Oceanside police didn't have any immediate comment about what was happening at Seau's home but are expected to provide details soon.

The San Diego Chargers sent out a message on Twitter that said: "Due to the current reports about Junior Seau, today's season ticket-holder conference call with Head Coach Norv Turner has been canceled."

PHOTOS: Notable deaths of 2012

Seau, an all-American at USC and 12-time NFL Pro Bowl linebacker, played 13 seasons with the San Diego Chargers and three seasons with the Dolphins. He left the game briefly but then signed and played with the New England Patriots before calling it quits for good in 2010.

"He was a local hero -- he certainly gave back to the community and to the youth through his Junior Seau Foundation," Oceanside Mayor Jim Wood told the North County Times. "Our thoughts and prayers go out to his family and friends."

RELATED:

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Junior Seau fell asleep at wheel before cliff crash, police say

Skid marks show sandy trail of Junior Seau's plunge over cliff

-- Tony Perry in Oceanside

Photo: Junior Seau in 2006. Credit: Sandy Huffaker / Associated Press

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