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Whitney Houston death: No visible signs of trauma on body

Los Angeles County coroner's officials said singer Whitney Houston's body showed no signs of trauma during an examination Sunday

Los Angeles County coroner's officials said singer Whitney Houston's body showed no signs of trauma during an examination Sunday.

An autopsy was inconclusive, officials said, adding that toxicology tests could hold the key to determining how she died.

"There were no visible signs of trauma on the body," said Ed Winter, a spokesman for the coroner's office. "We need additional testing."

PHOTOS: Whitney Houston | 1963-2012

Houston was found in the bathtub of her suite at the Beverly Hilton Hotel, and officials said they are trying to determine whether she drowned.

A member of Houston's entourage found her unresponsive Saturday afternoon and called authorities, officials said. Beverly Hills Fire Department paramedics performed CPR for about 20 minutes before declaring her dead, they said.

Sources who were briefed on the probe Sunday said drowning is one of several scenarios that investigators are exploring. The sources stressed that investigators still have many unanswered questions, particularly about what Houston was doing in the hours before her death. Investigators are also interviewing family members and friends to determine whether Houston had any underlying medical conditions, said the sources, who spoke to The Times on the condition of anonymity because the case was ongoing.

Full coverage: The death of Whitney Houston

One source with knowledge of the case said that although Houston was found in the bathtub, officials are still unsure if she died of natural causes or was in some other way stricken.

Winter said Sunday that officials hope the toxicology tests will yield more clues. Beverly Hills police put a security hold on the case, so no more details were revealed.

"We won't make that final determination until all the tests are in." Winter said.

Photos: Stars react

Houston struggled with drug and alcohol problems for years, and last May her spokeswoman said the singer was going back into rehab.

She was in Beverly Hills for music industry titan Clive Davis’ annual pre-Grammys party Saturday night at the Beverly Hilton. During the previous few days, she had made several public appearances. At times, she was said to have been acting strangely, skipping around a ballroom and reportedly doing handstands near the hotel pool. Houston reportedly greeted people with a warm smile but at times appeared disheveled in mismatched clothes and with her hair dripping wet.

On Thursday, she dropped by the rehearsals for the pre-Grammys party, where the news media -- including a Times reporter -- were in attendance. A Grammy staffer said that as reporters interviewed Davis and singers Brandy and Monica, Houston was dancing just off camera to make them laugh. Grammy personnel expressed concern that she'd be caught on camera and that reporters would write about her behavior.

TIMELINE: Whitney Houston highs and lows

Beverly Hills police, who are investigating the case in conjunction with the coroner's office, said Saturday night it was too early to determine whether drugs or alcohol played any role in Houston's death.

Beverly Hills police Lt. Mark Rosen said Houston was at the hotel with a large entourage of family, friends and co-workers, some of whom helped identify her body after she was declared dead.

On Sunday morning, a bleary-eyed Ray J was briefly inside the lobby of the Beverly Hilton with three companions.

The music star, who reportedly had been dating Houston off and on, had his hood up and was being consoled.

"Whitney dead," he repeated multiple times, as one friend grabbed him by the shoulders. "Whitney dead. We all gotta live with that."

A little later, he left the hotel in the passenger seat of a red Ferrari.

The hotel has been besieged by fans who assembled a makeshift memorial of flowers, candles and notes for Houston.

"Bittersweet memories that is all we will take with us," read one note. "We will always LOVE you."

One woman drove by, turning onto Santa Monica Boulevard from Wilshire Boulevard, asking a reporter on the street corner to add a bouquet to the mix. Another woman snapped a photo with her iPhone on the way to a bus stop.

"Oh, there's my bus, I'm always late," she said, running to the stop. "Just hope I'm not late to heaven."

Worshipers at the First A.M.E. Church of Los Angeles held a special moment of silence in honor of Houston at their 10 a.m. service on Sunday. Their pastor, John J. Hunter, described Houston as "one of the most dynamic voices of our time," according to an announcement on the church website. "We are all deeply saddened by her passing, and our hearts go out to her family," he said.

Meanwhile, Houston’s teenage daughter was taken by paramedics from the Beverly Hilton to a nearby hospital Sunday morning. She was reportedly released in the afternoon.

RELATED:

Daughter released from hospital

Bathtub drowning among scenarios probed

Too early to confirm drug link, officials say

-- Andrew Blankstein and Robert Faturechi in Beverly Hills and Ari Bloomekatz in Los Angeles

Photo: Whitney Houston performs at the 2004 World Music Awards in Las Vegas. Credit: Eric Jamison / Associated Press

 
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L.A. Now is the Los Angeles Times’ breaking news section for Southern California. It is produced by more than 80 reporters and editors in The Times’ Metro section, reporting from the paper’s downtown Los Angeles headquarters as well as bureaus in Costa Mesa, Long Beach, San Diego, San Francisco, Sacramento, Riverside, Ventura and West Los Angeles.
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