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Barry Bonds prosecutor: No jail time 'almost laughable'

December 16, 2011 | 12:53 pm

Photo: Former baseball player Barry Bonds leaves federal court Friday after being sentenced for obstructing justice in a government steroids investigation. Credit: Noah Berger / Associated PressFederal prosecutors in the Barry Bonds perjury trial said that his sentence of home confinement for a conviction on obstruction of justice was “almost laughable.”

U.S. Atty. Matthew A. Parrella strongly objected to Bonds’ probationary sentence, saying it amounted to “a slap on the wrist.” The former San Francisco Giants star was sentenced Friday to two years' probation, 30-day home confinement, 250 hours of community service and a $4,000 fine. 

Parrella also noted that Bonds would be confined to his 50,000-square-foot Beverly Hills home.

PHOTOS: Barry Bonds through the years

U.S. District Court Judge Susan Illston immediately stayed Bonds’ sentence pending an appeal.

Illston said the jury “got it exactly right” in convicting the baseball slugger of a single count of obstruction of justice.

But Illston added that she also was impressed with Bonds’ history of charitable actions, which she said he performed out of the public eye.

But Parrella objected to a probation officer’s recommendation for probation, saying Bonds’ evasive testimony before a federal grand jury reflected a long-established pattern of deceit.

“The defendant lived basically a double life for decades before this. He was well-versed in misleading people,’ Parrella said. “He had mistresses throughout his entire married life, through two marriages.”

But Illston interejected: “He wasn’t convicted for [adultery].”

Bonds, baseball's home run king, was convicted of obstruction in April for giving evasive testimony to a federal grand jury eight years ago during an investigation of doping in sports.

Bonds was charged with several counts of perjury and obstruction of justice for lying during the grand jury's probe of the Burlingame, Calif.-based Bay Area Laboratory Co-Operative, or BALCO, which sold banned substances to athletes.

The trial jury deadlocked on the perjury charges.

Federal sentencing guidelines recommend 15 to 21 months in prison for obstruction, but probation officials said Bonds’ offense warranted much less.

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-- Maura Dolan in San Francisco

Photo: Former baseball player Barry Bonds leaves federal court Friday after being sentenced for obstructing justice in a government steroids investigation. Credit: Noah Berger / Associated Press

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