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Parole hearing underway for suspect in Giants fan beating

June 20, 2011 | 10:42 am

Giovanni Ramirez A parole commissioner is expected to rule Monday whether the man described by Los Angeles Police Chief Charlie Beck as the prime suspect in the Dodger Stadium beating goes to state prison or is set free.

Giovanni Ramirez, 31, who police say beat Giants fan Bryan Stow on opening day, appeared at a closed hearing Monday at the Men’s Central Jail.

The commissioner is expected to rule whether Ramirez violated his parole conditions by being a felon in possession of a firearm and ammunition.

Earlier this month, the parole commissioner ruled there was not enough evidence to hold Ramirez in connection with the March 31 beating.

But he found probable cause to revoke Ramirez’s parole on the alleged gun and ammunition violations. Officers with the Los Angeles Police Department allegedly recovered the items inside a home where he was living.

Ramirez was offered a stipulated term of a year in prison without eligibility for any reduction for the violations, said Luis Patino, a spokesman for the state parole board.

He declined the offer, and a full revocation hearing was set for Monday, Patino said.

Ramirez has been in custody since May 22, when the LAPD announced he was the main suspect in the unprovoked beating of Stow, who suffered brain damage from punches and kicks by two assailants.

Beck has maintained his belief that Ramirez remains the prime suspect and his department will seek charges against him.

But Ramirez’s attorneys have publically raised questions about the LAPD case.

Attorney Anthony Brooklier said a dozen witnesses, including Ramirez's 10-year-old daughter, could place Ramirez at home around the time of the beating.

According to Brooklier, a palm print left on a car by one of the suspects will prove Ramirez did not commit the crime.

Ramirez also underwent two lie detector tests, and witnesses were asked to identify him in a lineup. Police have not discussed the results of either the lie detector tests or the lineup.

Brooklier also went to Los Angeles County Superior Court seeking to preserve a hotel video recorded April 1 that he claims could show his client had hair on his head.

Witnesses had described the primary suspect as having a shaved head.

Although Judge Patricia Schnegg said she did not have jurisdiction, authorities agreed to provide such video if it existed, and Brooklier received significant publicity concerning the issue.

RELATED:

Bryan Stow's family, children prepare for Father's Day

Any videotape evidence in Bryan Stow beating case cannot be destroyed 

Bloodstained jersey is not linked to Dodger Stadium beating case, sources say

-- Andrew Blankstein (Twitter @anblanx)

Photo: Giovanni Ramirez. Credit: Los Angeles Police Department

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