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Bin Laden's death: Some worry about retaliatory attacks

At a piano concert at the Blue Whale Bar in Little Tokyo downtown, Aaron Griffith first learned of the news about Osama bin Laden’s death on a CNN feed on his smartphone.

Griffith's reaction later, while dining at a nearby restaurant with friends, was “the stock market will go up tomorrow.”

Photo gallery: Reactions to Osama bin Laden death

Sitting nearby, Rocco Somazzi, a concert promoter who lives downtown, said he worried that “there might be a greater chance somebody might try to prove this isn’t a blow to [Al Qaeda]. Plus, gas prices might go up.”

Andrea Padova pointed out that it wasn’t that long ago that Americans were supporting Bin Laden’s activities in Afghanistan and that future ramifications might be hard to predict.

“I prefer to wait 10 years before I give an opinion,” he said.

A few tables over, Elton Keung, a USC senior, recalled the bombing of the Twin Towers in New York. At the time, he lived in New Jersey and could see smoke from the burning buildings from his middle school playground.

“It was very traumatizing,” he said.

He said his group learned the news about Bin Laden when they checked their texts after walking out of the movie “Source Code.” He said the news “worked in the context of the movie. It was trippy.”

He said he’s already been invited to parties at USC to celebrate Bin Laden’s demise.

Photo gallery: Reactions to Osama bin Laden death

“That’s kind of distasteful,” he said.

 A friend chimed in: “It’s just what college students need -- an excuse to drink. I’m sure they will invent drinks like ‘Dead Osama.’ ”

RELATED:

LAX, other airports on heightened alert

LAPD increases patrols of 'high-profile' religious institutions

Osama bin Laden dead: 'End of a dark era in U.S.-Muslim relations'

 -- Howard Blume

 
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