L.A. NOW

Southern California -- this just in

« Previous Post | L.A. NOW Home | Next Post »

Scattered showers continue; sewage spill closes Long Beach shore

Heavy rains on Sunday caused flooding and damage throughout southern California including Thousand Oaks, where a massive oak fell crushing a pick up truck in a residential driveway.

Scattered showers continued to be the order of the day Monday in Southern California.

Long Beach closed a section of its coast after a sewage release into the Los Angeles River upstream in Studio City. 

Photos: Spring storm rolls through Southland

Flowing mud swamped a retaining wall in Woodland Hills, causing the evacuation Sunday of 12 homes in the 4800 block of N. Regalo Road. Los Angeles Fire Department officials Monday said six homes remain affected, four of them yellow-tagged because of the amount of debris filling backyards. Another home was evacuated in Encino.

Months ago, some meteorologists confidently predicted a drier-than-normal Southern California winter.

But Sunday’s ferocious storm dumped so much water across the region that it shattered records in several communities. Downtown Los Angeles and many other areas have exceeded rainfall totals for an entire season — with three months still to go.

 “La Nina definitely was a bust,” said Bill Patzert, a climatologist at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and one of several meteorologists who predicted last fall that La Nina’s cold ocean currents would bring a drier-than-normal rainy season. “Long-range forecasting is not for wimps. You’ve got to man up and be humbled.”

The Arctic storm that passed through the region Sunday set daily rainfall records in many communities. In downtown L.A., 2.54 inches fell, about an inch more than the previous record set in 1943. Camarillo Airport had its wettest calendar day on record for March with 4.91 inches, and Santa Barbara saw 5.23 inches, also a record. As of Monday afternoon, downtown L.A. had logged 18.5 inches since the rainy season began.

That’s more than 3 inches over the average for the entire season, which ends June 30, said Stuart Seto, a weather specialist with the National Weather Service in Oxnard. Hurricane-force wind gusts up to 98 mph roared through mountain passes, while gusts between 50 and 60 mph toppled trees across Southern California's urban landscape.

More showers are forecast for Wednesday, Thursday and possibly Friday, though precipitation will be considerably lighter than Sunday’s deluge, Seto said. Saturday should be partly cloudy, with afternoon clearing.

RELATED:

First day of spring brings record rainfall

Motorists diverted off 5 Freeway seek shelter until morning

Roads closed amid flooding, snow, mudflows from heavy rains

-- Catherine Saillant

Photo: Heavy rains on Sunday caused flooding and damage throughout southern California including Thousand Oaks, where a massive oak fell crushing a pick up truck in a residential driveway. Credit: Michael Robinson Chavez / Los Angeles Times

 
Comments () | Archives (14)

A climatologist from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory says long range (5 months) is not for wimps and missed it completely. Yet climatologists continue to tell me the Earth is getting warm and they are positive what causes it?

Amazing.

It never seems to fail. These meteorologists predict the weather for the next several months and get it wrong. I have a hard time believing these clowns on the evening news.......

"Long range" is a relative term.

Listen, you global warming denier: there is a difference between weather (which is a short term concept, like the fact that it -- gasp!-- snows or rains in winter, for god's sake!) and climate (which is long term, like the fact that even small variations in temperature could have drastic effects overall on ice caps, rain forests, etc.).

Continue to believe that the climate is not changing -- and that humans have no hand in it to to continue to rationalize what probably for you is a ridiculously wasteful, selfish and unnecesary use of resources and carbon.

@James Andrews - So far, data from the past half century has backed up that claim. Oceans, which store about 80% of all the energy in the Earth’s climate, are continuing to take in more heat and are on the rise. Global sea ice, and especially Arctic sea ice, has taken a noticeable downward trend. Sea level continues to rise. Solar irradiance has been pretty stable at around 1366 w/m2 since 1960, and has decreased slightly in the past decade if you're looking for a short-term trend.

The difference in predictability of seasonal weather (like this winter), and long-term climate effects to global warming is in the difference between initial conditions vs boundary conditions. The boundary condition for global warming are green-house-gases in the atmosphere: no matter how you turn it, it will warm on average. However, for any given year, even 100 years from now, the weather can be significantly below or above average depending on how a season starts out and how some internal climate fluctuations develop over the course of a season. In fact, there's growing evidence that global warming might actually increase these kinds of extremes.

For all you doubters: you wouldn't dispute the statement that we can - with near 100% confidence - predict that the summer is warmer than the winter, would you? This statement is based on the known boundary conditions: more insolation in the summer just makes it warmer. Anyone in the forecasting business will tell you that predictions in the 1-month to 10 year range is much harder than predicting climate change on centennial time scales.

“Long-range forecasting is not for wimps. You’ve got to man up and be humbled.”

Good lord, my cut-off for moderately reliable weather forecasting is about 48 hours, barring a massive tropical storm (which makes it a lot easier). "Not for wimps"? More like "long-range forecasting is not for people who expect predictions better than throwing darts would give you." Like earthquake predictions, it belongs in the grave of failed pseudo-science. Predict more rain than average ... half the time you are right! Hooray!

Yea the climate is changing but what about Global Warming? First it was Global Warming but now its called Climate Change which is so vague of a term it could be anything. So the scientist did not "man up" on the global warming call but now we get this ambivalent climate change? Smells like a rat. I suspect what is happening with the changing climate has nothing to do with carbon emissions and more to do with natural forces of the earth changing that few scientist care to talk about nor predict. Better to come up with a theory that can increase tax revenue for governments who in turn will keep the funds flowing to the scientific community.
Yea the climate is changing but what about Global Warming? First it was Global Warming but now its called Climate Change which is so vague of a term it could be anything. So the scientist did not "man up" on the global warming call but now we get this ambivalent climate change? Smells like a rat. I suspect what is happening with the changing climate has nothing to do with carbon emissions and more to do with natural forces of the earth changing that few scientist care to talk about nor predict. Better to come up with a theory that can increase tax revenue for governments who in turn will keep the funds flowing to the scientific community.
Its like one hand feeding the other.
Meanwhile the earth and universe will continue to flabbergast us all with unpredictable changes as even seemingly familiar earthquakes continuing to confound all the so-called experts. We are the most advanced animals living on this earth but we don't have the power to change how mother nature operates.

Ok, Rick. Let's raise gas to $10 a gallon, destroy our economy and our quality of life as a nation, drastically drive up costs for food, clothes, air travel, etc. based upon a theory offered by people who can't even predict whether it will be a dry or rainy winter. We'll also ignore the fact that the climate hasn't warmed in the past 10+ years, which goes agaisnt the global warming models. Oh, and I almost forgot, ClimateGate -- the internal emails from the Climatic Research Unit which is the "science" behind global warming - established that the "science" behind global warming is a total fraud.

Yeah, there's no such thing as global warming... just go to the inuit lands and ask them about their perma frost disappearing... That's not natural warming when it goes away in the matter of a decade. That's man warming... Speaking of man warming, I need a Snuggie.

wow - sure are some touchy folks out there from the Church of Warming

Any knucklehead who tries to compare the predictions of global warming to those of the weather probably wouldn't believe in global warming anyway.

Hey whoa, wait a minute. This was the most beautiful, sunny Winter, I can remember. We had rain in December, then perfect sunny dry weather for like two months with a small rain event here and there. March was nice too until this last rain. It's Spring now folks and it was an awesome Winter. I'd say they were right on. When it did rain, it was heavy and a lot of water fell but in between it was just wonderful.

This is a perfect example of climatologists and their phony global warming fraud.

Thank you Rick! unfortunately, i think you are wasting your time because people like James are hard headed imbeciles


Connect

Recommended on Facebook


Advertisement

In Case You Missed It...

Video

About L.A. Now
L.A. Now is the Los Angeles Times’ breaking news section for Southern California. It is produced by more than 80 reporters and editors in The Times’ Metro section, reporting from the paper’s downtown Los Angeles headquarters as well as bureaus in Costa Mesa, Long Beach, San Diego, San Francisco, Sacramento, Riverside, Ventura and West Los Angeles.
Have a story tip for L.A. Now?
Please send to newstips@latimes.com
Can I call someone with news?
Yes. The city desk number is (213) 237-7847.

Categories




Get Alerts on Your Mobile Phone

Sign me up for the following lists: