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Fourth ex-big leaguer testifies he got injections from Barry Bonds' trainer

Former Oakland Athletics player Randy Velarde Retired baseball player Randy Velarde, who last played for the Oakland As, testified Wednesday that he was injected with human growth hormone by Barry Bonds’ former personal trainer during a series of a parking lot meetings in 2002.

Velarde was one of four major league players called by the prosecution in an effort to prove that Bonds lied when he told a grand jury in 2003 that he did not knowingly take steroids or human growth hormone. Bonds also is charged with lying when he told the grand jury that Greg Anderson, his former personal trainer, never injected him.

Velarde testified Wednesday that Bobby Estalella, who was playing for the Yankees at the time, referred him to Anderson in late 2001. Velarde said he knew that Anderson was Bonds’ personal trainer. Velarde said he called Anderson, and Anderson sent him some pills -- human growth hormone.

"I explained to him that I wasn't  getting any effect from the pills, and he mentioned the next step would be injection," Velarde said.

The two then met in a parking lot during spring training in Arizona, one of several such meetings, Velarde said. He testified that Anderson injected him in his arm. Velarde also said he injected himself in the abdomen with human growth hormone.

The injections gave him “endurance, strength," Velarde said.

Anderson, who served time behind bars for illegal steroid distribution, was jailed last week for refusing to testify at Bonds’ trial. Anderson has served nearly two years in prison, most of it because he would not testify against Bonds.

Bonds told the grand jury investigating steroid distribution in 2003 that Anderson gave him substances known as “the clear” and “the cream,” which prosecutors said were steroids. But Bonds said that Anderson told him they were flaxseed oil and arthritis cream.

RELATED:

Ex-mistress testifies Bonds admitted to her that he took steroids

Bonds' personal trainer supplied steroids to other players, according to testimony

One-time family friend testifies slugger asked him to research effects of steroids

-- Maura Dolan in San Francisco

Photo: Former Oakland A's player Randy Velarde leaves a federal courthouse after testifying in the Barry Bonds perjury trial Wednesday. Credit: Paul Sakuma / Associated Press

 
Comments () | Archives (7)

If the judge instructed the jury that the testimony from the players does not mean that another player took or administered steriods, then why are they allowed to testify. It looks like a government dog and pony routine. None of them were with Bonds when (if) he took steriods and none of them provided it to him, if he used. So what's the point of the trial? To spend money? There isn't any substance to the witnesses and therefore they should not be allowed to testify. If you have the evidence, show it.

A banker gives inside information to some of his clients, who trade on that information.

Are all of his clients guilty?

Does an admission from one client make other clients guilty?

A banker gives inside information to some of his clients, who trade on that information.

Are all of his clients guilty?

Does an admission from one client make other clients guilty?

THE RULE OF LAW....... "IT ISN'T WHAT YOU KNOW, IT'S WHAT YOU CAN PROVE IN COURT"....... AND WITHOUT ANDERSON THE GOVT. CAN'T PROVE ANYTHING!!!!!!!!

If the prosecution is hanging their hat on getting all these players to testify that they got it from Greg Anderson and NOT Barry, they are truly the idiots here. The only thing these D. A.'s are going to be saying in public at the end of this will be; Welcome to Burger King, can I take you order? Idiots!

A banker gives inside information to some of his clients, who trade on that information.

Are all of his clients guilty?

Does an admission from one client make other clients guilty?

THE RULE OF LAW....... "IT ISN'T WHAT YOU KNOW, IT'S WHAT YOU CAN PROVE IN COURT"....... AND WITHOUT AN ADMISSION FROM ANDERSON OR BONDS THE GOVT. CAN'T PROVE ANYTHING!!!!!!!!

With all the other issues in the world, I wonder why this really matters?
Just had to read the story to see why space in cyber world was being used on this story.

Why is money and time being spend on investigating Bonds and Clemens if they use or not use HGH? Who cares! What we need to do is investigate all these corporations that cause the recession in 2008! This is what they need to investigate so we do not have another recession in the future.

Liars, Cheats, and Thieves, one and all. These personal skills, the All Star lineup of character that now defines American sports.


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