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Vision for Watts garden: Infuse agriculture into an urban landscape

Mudtown

After the City Council placed a moratorium on new fast-food restaurants in a swath of South Los Angeles, the questions of food and health and justice became topics for an architect to consider.

What role might urban architecture play in helping to feed the inner city? That was a question professor Michael Pinto, teaching in the Community Design Program at the Southern California Institute of Architecture, asked his students.

"In a time when sustainability is integral to our conceptions of architecture, we are finding that our city is not at all sustainable," Pinto said.

He and 13 SCI-Arc students organized what he called a "think tank" around the issue last year, collaborating with Watts residents to consider Mudtown Farms, a 2.5-acre spot adjacent to the Jordan Downs housing project just blocks from Watts Towers.

Read the full story here.

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-- Mary MacVean

Photo: SCI-Arc student Janica Ley’s collage proposes that the Mudtown site, 2.5 acres near the Jordan Downs housing project, become a farm. Ley was one of 13 students who came up with site ideas, some realistic, some whimsical. Credit: Janica Ley

 
Comments () | Archives (3)

WLCAC HAS HAD THIS PROPERTY FOR FIVE YEARS AND DID NOTHING
WITH TO IMPROVE IT, THIS PROPERTY WILL SOON BE PART OF THE
REDEVELOPMENT OF JORDAN DOWNS SO WHY THE INTEREST IN
THIS PROPERTY NOW, SO THEY CAN JACK UP THE PRICE WHEN TI IS
TIME FOR THE CITY TO BUY IT BACK, THE CITY NEEDS TO CHECK
THIS OUT

Is this advancement for society, folks having to farm their own plot again? Seems like feudal Europe. You are not going to be able to work at a real job so you will have to grow your own to eat on the feurdal Lord's land.

Also the bugs are going to thrive in this environment of vegetable plots all around. This was tried in the 18th century and let over the centuries to modern farming.

"feed the inner city"?

With what the people want to eat. Namely junk food.

The land would be better used by creating jobs, not farms.


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