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Teens catch one huge fish off Newport coast

The Newport Beach fishing world is talking about three teens who caught a huge opah fish off Crystal Cove.

Randall Hause, 17, Daniel Segerblom, 15, and Sean Segerblom, 12, have just about eaten all of the edible meat from the 143-pound catch, dishing it out to friends and neighbors and indulging in it themselves.

The opah is a deepwater fish more typically caught in Hawaii. It's also a delicacy. The bad news, however, is that only 30% of its body is edible, what with the bones and tough skin.

And so, the catch, about 40 pounds of meat in all, is slowly being devoured and will soon be relegated to mere photographic history for the boys, who fell 20 pounds shy of a record for hooking such a species at the Balboa Angling Club, said the father of one of the boys.

 

Only three opah a year of this size are caught in Southern California.

The catch, which occurred at 10 a.m. last Friday, was a doozy indeed for the boys, all of whom managed to rope the fish's tail and haul it in after it momentarily broke free.

Read the full story here.

-- Tom Regan

Photo: Newport Beach residents Randall Hause, 17, Daniel Segerblom, 15, and Sean Segerblom, 12, stand with the 143-pound opah they caught offshore from Crystal Cove. Credit: Daily Pilot

 
Comments () | Archives (9)

Sorry, but I wish that fish was still a-swimmin' in the deep blue sea. That amazing creature looks sad and out of place there on the dock with the youngsters...

Whatever happened to catch 'n release?

what was it caught on?

lure, bait, etc..

Catch, take a pic...and release please...

Unfortunately, these large fish are removed from the breeding pool when caught, so there will probably be ever-fewer giant opahs here in the future. Just look at what happened to the giants off the Florida Keys...

A fish caught at a depth of a couple hundred feet will likely have it's swim bladder expanding to the point that it crushes other organs. The fish was probably close to death upon being caught. Not every fish can be catch and release.

It says it's a deep water fish. Once when you bring it up to the surface, it's swim bladder is too inflated for it to swim back down. So it's a gonner anyhow and why not bring it back to be eaten?

That what I call a Fish. Congrats to the teen. I have been fishing for a longtime and never caught a big one like that. what does it taste like. It looks like a cross between a rockcode and butter mouth perch

IT SEEMS A SHAME THAT ONLY FORTY POUNDS OF THE FISH IS EDIBLE. IT IS ALSO A SHAME THAT THE FORTY POUNDS OF EDIBLE FLESH COULD NOT HAVE BEEN PRESERVED AND CANNED IN SOMEWHAT THE SAME WAY SARDINES ARE CANNED SINCE THE FISH IS A DELICACY. BUT, GOOD CATCH ANYWAY.

With "Only three opah a year of this size are caught in Southern California", you should have released it. I bet this fish is older than the BOYS who caught it. If you have the money to go out on a boat fishing you have the money to buy a veggie lunch. Fishing is "hunting" and it looks like the fun of killing was the reason for going out on the water for this group. I am very sad for the fish's friends and family, now that it won't be coming home.


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