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UC increases number of out-of-state and international students for the fall

A record number of out-of-state and international students are planning to enroll as University of California freshmen in the fall, the result of a controversial effort by the revenue-hungry university to garner the much-higher tuition these non-Californians must pay.

About 8.2% of UC's projected total of 37,151 freshmen will be from out of state or from another country, up from 6% for the school year that just ended, according to statistics released Wednesday at a UC Board of Regents meeting in San Francisco. UC Berkeley and UCLA will have the largest proportion of the non-California students, with Berkeley's figures showing the most dramatic change. The Berkeley campus doubled its percentage of nonresident freshmen, who will comprise 22.6% of the class for this fall, the figures show.

California students and families have expressed concerns that some in-state students are being squeezed out as UC's nine undergraduate campuses pursue the additional $22,000 that a non-Californian must pay on top of regular UC fees. But UC officials contend that the university is accepting as many Californians as state financing will allow and that the additional funds from out-of-state students will help to subsidize classes and campus services for Californians.

A UC commission planning for the university's future has suggested raising the share of non-California residents to 10% universitywide, an idea that alarms some politicians and educators even though it still would be modest compared to other states. Prestigious state universities in Colorado, Michigan, Virginia and elsewhere regularly enroll more than 30% of their freshman classes from outside their borders.

However, Patrick M. Callan, president of the National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education, a San Jose-based think tank, said following those states' examples could harm UC politically and economically if state legislators come to see the nonresident tuition as an excuse to keep reducing funding for higher education funding.

"It doesn't help to build your case in the state to be revenue-chasing around the country and the world," he said. "I understand the financial constraints they are in, but this should have been one of the last resorts, not one of the first."

UCLA is increasing its freshman class somewhat, keeping its ranks of Californians and out-of-state Americans about the same but boosting the number of international freshmen to 364, which is 207 more than last year. As a result, non-Californians are expected to make up about 15% of the freshman class, compared to 11.4% last year. Thomas Lifka, UCLA's associate vice chancellor for student academic services, said UCLA wants both the additional revenue and the cultural and intellectual diversity that foreign students bring. He said public resentment about the shift "doesn't take into account that the state is not meeting its responsibility to subsidize students."

UC Berkeley reduced its number of in-state students to 4,059, about 900 fewer than last year, and significantly increased the number of both out-of-state students and foreigners so that the two groups comprise 22.6% of enrolled freshmen, double last year’s share, according to the figures. Campus officials say that is part of a long-range plan to have about 20% of undergraduates from outside of California.

-- Larry Gordon

 
Comments () | Archives (53)

If anyone still thinks that California has NOT gone to the pits-now this.

To the few poor slobs (me included) who actually work for a living now this---the only people who get free health benefits are illegals and bums, the only people who get into the UC system are illegals and out of state students.

First chance I get I'm firing my employees and relocating to a real state-like TEXAS!

Jay

"cultural and intellectual diversity that foreign students bring" It's all about the mighty dollar that these rich foreign kids bring. Nothing else.

Increasing the out-of-state student population not only increases revenue during a critical time, but it could also boosts academics. When you admit the top California and out-of-state students, you get the best of both worlds.

This is the most inefficient business in California. Perhaps they should consider layoffs before cutting out more in-state freshman.

This is a disgrace. Illegals need to be paying out-of-state tuition rates. I hope a parent of a citizen who's being nailed higher tuition because they live in another state sees this and files a lawsuit. If we can't educate our own legally residing California and other state's youth, *no one* from another country should be getting a free ride first.

Big deal. So how much money that would amount to, less than $20 millions. And of course these students took the place of Californian pay taxes (parents) students. I guess if they raise the taxes on the wealthy people by 0.1 % will cover that. And these wealthy people wouldn't know that they have 0.1% less money. What difference would it make if you have $500 millions or $499.5 millions. Miss Whitman could have saved some the waste on her campaign and covered these $20 millions

This is so sad. I know that other countries are doing the same thing (Australia) but it is such a unfair situation for California secondary students. Their dreams and ambitions are being put on the back-shelf as the investment of the state in their education wanes.

Maybe we (the state education system) could make a business out of charging international and out-of-state students from elementary school thru Master's Degree. Offer one-stop shopping for one's education if money is no object. We could create schools (charter schools) that board and teach out-of-country/state children and put money INTO the education budget.

Like any institution that is being squeezed financially in a budget crisis, the University is bound to seek revenue to supplement its dwindling coffers. This move should come as no surprise. If the taxpayers of California want a high quality education at a low price, then restoring some of the decades of cuts to higher education would be a good first step.

I guess it doesn't pay to be a resident of CA and a U.S. citizen. I'm now in favor of cutting funding to the U.C. system. Californians built the schools and fund them to the tune of millions of dollars per year, yet they would prefer we seek education elsewhere.

The University needs to be brought under control. Allowing them to replace California students with foreigners to keep their bloated salaries is obscene.

UCLA's been going down the toilet for a long time. I guess if enough out-of-staters get turned down by Berkeley and put UCLA as their back-up school, then nice strategy. Frankly, why would anyone pay that much money to come from out-of-state to go to a bloated, eroding California state school. I'd get more quality and bang for my buck by going to SC...

My son is likely one of those high SAT, high GPA, AP taking, community college taking recent High School grads that was put out to pasture by UC this year.

After being put in a waiting list at UCSB he decided to blow the state and go to a private university out of state. The fact that UCSB eventually decided to accept him (plus consolation, and unpaid for, acceptances to Merced and Riverside) became irrelevant.

One bitten, twice shy.

And so, we ourselves are considering moving out of state when in two years my daughter graduates from HS. Perhaps sooner so we can perhaps put her into the University of Washington as residents. In that state, like most, the public universities remember that their main responsibility is to teach the children of their taxpayers.

The UC is lost. Instead of cutting their waste they decided to forgo their responsibility to the citizens of California. The citizens that have been paying them for all these years.

Let the UC go private. Time to start a new California University System that serves California, not itself.

Besides... hmm... after one year, do those "out of state" students can easily become California residents, right? Then what? Residents with parents that don't pay state taxes???

Required Documents For Residence Determination (Education Code: 54024(e))

The following factors are considered in determining California residency (a minimum of 3 must be provided):

1. Ownership of residential property or continuous occupancy of rented or leased property in California
2. Registering to vote and voting in California
3. Licensing from California for professional practice
4. Active membership in service or social clubs
5. Presence of spouse, children or other close relatives in the state
6. Showing California as home address on federal income tax form
7. Payment of California state income tax as a resident
8. Possessing California motor vehicle license plates
9. Possessing a California driver’s license
10. Maintaining a permanent military address or home of record in California while in the armed forces
11. Establishing and maintaining an active California bank account
12. Being the petitioner for a divorce in California; Conduct inconsistent with a claim of California


UC is stupid...

UC President Yudof can save $3,000,000 RIGHT NOW and the faculty, staff and students will not suffer! UC President Yudof Approves Millions of $ on consultants to do UCB Chancellor Birgeneau & his Cal Vice Chancellor’s jobs!
The UCB budget gap has grown to $150 million, and still the Chancellor is spending money that isn't there on expensive ($3,000,000) outside consultants. His reasons range from the need for impartiality to requiring the "innovative thinking, expertise, and new knowledge" the consultants would bring.

Does this mean that the faculty and management of a world-class research and teaching institution lack the knowledge, integrity, impartiality, innovation, and professionalism to come up with solutions? Have they been fudging their research for years? The consultants will glean their recommendations from interviewing faculty and the UCB management that hired them; yet solutions could be found internally if the Chancellor were doing the job HE was hired to do. Consultant fees would be far better spent on meeting the needs of students.

There can be only one conclusion as to why creative solutions have not been forthcoming from the professionals within UCB: Chancellor Birgeneau has lost credibility and the trust of the faculty as well as of the Academic Senate leadership that represents them. Even if the faculty agrees with the consultants' recommendations - disagreeing might put their jobs in jeopardy - the underlying problem of lost credibility and trust will remain.
Please take action. Contact your representatives in Sacramento, local newspaper and TV and Radio Stations.

Can someone please explain how this works toward the implementation of UC's self-proclaimed goal to educate California students? Their mission statement, in part, reads, "We teach--educating students at all levels, from undergraduate to the most advanced graduate level. Undergraduate programs are available to all eligible California high-school graduates and community college transfer students who wish to attend the University of California." They are violating their own precepts, and have been turning away eligible California students every semester for several years in order to accept more out of state applicants and in order to meet their illegal, Jerry-built affirmative action quotas.

Someone needs to do a study of how the UCs actually make their freshman admissions decisions. My son graduated from high school last year in California in the top 1% of his class with a 4.3 GPA. Among many other things, he was captain of two sports teams, lettering in both sports, competed at CIF in both sports, was first chair in band in his instrument, and was a peer tutor. He did not get accepted into either UC Berkeley or UCLA. Instead, he ended up going to school out of state. How does it make any sense for California to be sending so many of its best and brightest out of state to school while at the same time increasing the number of out of state students it accepts? Can someone remind me why I'm paying taxes in this state?

Excellent, UC's have been living in a bubble for too long. I'm glad this new policy will introduce California students to more diverse perspectives and ideas.

Yup, they priced the grandchildren of a forth generation Californian right out of the state. There are not openings for California residents remaining.

So, out-of-state freshman fees are great, but these students all become in-state for the sophomore year and beyond. No extra money for the state, but another spot stolen from an original in-state student.

Also, that out-of-state tuition, though higher, is still subsidized by the citizens of California. Should the state also buy cars and sell them at half-price to foreigners? The same logic applies.

Finally, no one at the UC's or CSU ever verifies in-state residency claims.

The UC regents are stealing from the California students and citizens, and pawning the openings to foreigners who will become educated on our dime, and then fly home to compete with us.

This is ridiculous. California residents are being denied admission and the UC takes in foreigners in their place? The argument that foreign students provide "diversity" is laughable in this state. The UC administrators have colossal nerve to do this. I hope state legislators keep this in mind when they consider the UC budget.

At UCSF medical school, the administration not only turns a blind eye but tells
incoming freshman that that they only have to pay out of state tuition for one year.

How does it pay off? If things have not changed, tuition reverts to cal-resident fees after only one year... hmmm,

California is a sinking ship.

The state of California only provides 1/4 of UC's budget, so quit whining when UC seeks revenues elsewhere. Unless, of course, the state puts the money where their mouth is and pays up.

Uh, yeah. One of our students from Granite Hills HS in Apple Valley graduated this year with a 4.6, a 2180 on the SAT, passed ELEVEN AP exams, and did NOT get into Berkeley engineering. He got into everywhere else that he applied. And, it was not a racial thing- he is white AND Pacific Islander. Lesser students from our school did gain entry into other programs at Berkeley. So Berkeley is still pretty clearly playing little games with admissions. This is discouraging, for it should be about academic merit and nothing else.

Who are these out-of-state and foreign students who are being accepted at UC Berkeley and UCLA? I'd like to see the UC Board of Regents post their stats. My son was a top California student who was rejected by both UC Berkeley and UCLA and is going to school out of state as a result. I can't tell you how angry this announcement made me.

 
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