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Will 'Superclogger' puppet show entertain commuters or distract drivers?

June 2, 2010 |  9:50 am

Curbed L.A. is reporting that artist (and USC alumnus) Joel Kyack has a unique idea to keep rush-hour commuters entertained: a puppet show.

The show, "Superclogger," launched Tuesday and will be performed in the back of a white pickup truck on various freeways throughout the city.

Apparently, nearby drivers will be able to tune in to the show on their radios and follow updates on Twitter @superclogger10. Many of the people commenting on the Curbed post wonder if distracting drivers, even during rush hour on Interstate 405, is a good idea:

Troubled Mind says: "Yes, this is brilliant. Something to encourage tailgating as well as taking drivers' attention away from what's going on around them."

Here are some other goings-on around Web L.A.:

Addressing L.A. traffic: Meanwhile, the Atlantic has an interview with L.A Department of Transportation official John Fisher about what causes congestion on our freeways and how it's being addressed. The puppet shows probably aren't helping matters:

And transportation engineering can't do it all; we really depend on enforcement and education. … If motorists are inattentive because they're texting while driving, it's the same. It all comes down to people, and people have individual minds. They don't behave necessarily like you would want them to.

L.A. addressing public murals: LAist reports that a City Council panel is taking a look at Portland, Ore.'s, public mural program as a jumping-off point to get L.A.'s back on track:

But in 2003, the decline of Los Angeles murals began after the city stopped funding graffiti removal or any organized plan for production. Then under the sign ordinance murals were no longer seen as works of art but rather the same as advertisements; and now they are essentially illegal in Los Angeles.

Behind the scenes at Disneyland Railroad: If you're interested in how Disneyland Railroad works, the O.C. Register has a great behind-the-scenes video of the engineers:

-- Anthony Pesce

Have some news for Linking L.A.? Contact Times reporter Anthony Pesce.

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