L.A. NOW

Southern California -- this just in

« Previous Post | L.A. NOW Home | Next Post »

City officials and police union reach deal to avoid LAPD furloughs, but details are sketchy

October 13, 2009 |  3:42 pm
Los Angeles negotiators have reached a tentative two-year contract agreement with the city police union that apparently will avert the need for officer furloughs and shave $50 million to $100 million from L.A.’s $405-million budget shortfall.

To become official, the proposed deal must be ratified by the 9,900-member Los Angeles Police Protective League and approved by the City Council. Details of the confidential contract agreement were not disclosed.

The council approved the tentative agreement during a closed-door session today. Council President Eric Garcetti said the proposal would save the city “tens of millions of dollars." He said a majority of members were opposed to furloughs or any other action that would reduce the number of police officers patrolling city streets.

Negotiations have been ongoing since before July, when the police union’s contract expired.

On Monday, Garcetti and Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa announced that they had enough votes on the council to ensure that the city would replace the hundreds of officers who normally leave the force through attrition every year. Some council members favor suspending police hiring to help address the city’s precarious financial situation.

“As in any contract negotiation, neither side got everything they want," said Paul Weber, president of the Los Angeles Police Protective League. "We believe this contract reflects the state of the current budget crisis faced by the city.” 

Weber said the dates and times for ratification would be announced shortly and that details of the agreement would be "presented and fully discussed" with union members. "Pursuant to the terms of the negotiations process and our commitment to our membership, the LAPPL will not disclose the terms of the tentative agreement pending a ratification vote.”

-- Phil Willon at L.A. City Hall

Comments 

Advertisement










Video