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Aldous Huxley archive finds home at UCLA library

March 5, 2009 |  8:00 pm

A photograph of Aldous Huxley and a picture of his hand are some of the images that are being archived from his home in Los Angeles.

The UCLA library has acquired the literary archive of Aldous Huxley, the visionary essayist and novelist who is perhaps best known for his book "Brave New World," which dealt with the dehumanizing effects of scientific progress.

The collection contains literary materials Huxley created after his Los Angeles home was destroyed by fire in 1961, as well as correspondence, photographs, audiotapes, type scripts and galley proofs retrieved from publishers after his death in 1963. Also included are the papers of his wife, Laura Huxley, an author and lay therapist.

The literary materials include manuscripts and working papers for 12 books; 35 essays, articles and speeches; and 31 lectures. Among hundreds of letters are love letters between the writer and his wife. There are recordings of many of his lectures and of him reading from his novel "Time Must Have a Stop," and English and French poetry.

-- Dan Weikel

A photograph of Aldous Huxley and a picture of his hand are some of the images that are being archived from his home in Los Angeles. Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times

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