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What would Anne Rice do? [Updated]

August 1, 2010 | 10:30 am

Annerice_statuary
Anne Rice, the author of "Interview With the Vampire" and its sequels, has decided that her Christian faith no longer fits with the Christian church. She announced this very personal decision on Facebook on Wednesday, generating more than 2,000 comments on two posts that went up within five minutes of each other.

In the first, she wrote: "Today I quit being a Christian. I'm out. I remain committed to Christ as always but not to being 'Christian' or to being part of Christianity. It's simply impossible for me to 'belong' to this quarrelsome, hostile, disputatious, and deservedly infamous group. For ten years, I've tried. I've failed. I'm an outsider. My conscience will allow nothing else."

"I quit being a Christian," she continued. "I'm out. In the name of Christ, I refuse to be anti-gay. I refuse to be anti-feminist. I refuse to be anti-artificial birth control. I refuse to be anti-Democrat. I refuse to be anti-secular humanism. I refuse to be anti-science. I refuse to be anti-life. In the name of Christ, I quit Christianity and being Christian. Amen."

In addition to the attention it drew on Facebook, Rice's declaration was circulated widely on the Internet and by the mainstream media; even the Associated Press picked it up. She may have created more of a media splash with her departing-the-church announcement than she did when she showed up at a booksigning in a coffin.

Rice's Christianity seemed an awkward worldview for an author who so thoroughly imagined evil vampires -- sexy evil vampires, even.

In 2008, Rice sought to illuminate her journey in faith with the memoir "Called Out of Darkness: A Spiritual Confession." She had an inner voice, she wrote, that said, "Write for God. Write for Him. Write only for Him." Her recent books include "Christ the Lord: Out of Egypt" (2005), "Christ the Lord: The Road to Cana " (2008) and "Angel Time" (2009).

Yet despite this focus on Christ and angels, Rice, who was brought up Catholic, said in her memoir that the church's laws caused her pain. "How was I to become a card-carrying member of a church that condemned my gay son?"

If I were more of a religious scholar, I could find a church for Rice that is dedicated to Christ and not anti-gay or anti-feminist or anti-birth-control or anti-Democrat or anti-secular-humanist. I'm sure people who know more about this than I do have tried to help Rice find her way to a church that might fit her beliefs.

What I do know is that, sometimes, causing a stir can help spark interest in an author's work. So in case you're curious, Anne Rice's next angel book, "Of Love and Evil," is due on shelves in November.

-- Carolyn Kellogg
twitter.com/paperhaus

[For the record, 1:20 p.m. Aug. 2: An earlier version of this post referred to Anne Rice's novel as "Interview with a Vampire." The correct title is "Interview with the Vampire."]

Photo: Anne Rice at home in La Jolla, Calif., with some of her Christian icons in December 2005. Credit: Los Angeles Times


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