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'Dynasty' patriarch John Forsythe dead at 92

April 2, 2010 |  1:18 pm

Forsythe globes"I like to be what I am, a reasonably simply happy kind of fellow," John Forsythe once said, according to a tribute website. The veteran actor died Thursday from complications of pneumonia after a long battle with colon cancer, his representative said Friday.

Forsythe, whose resume goes back seven decades, became most famous as the patriarch of the Carrington clan on "Dynasty." His voice resonates however in the minds of many as the mysterious Charles Townsend from the earlier TV series "Charlie's Angels"; he revisited that voice-from-the-speaker-phone role in the "Angels" movies released in 2000 and 2003. 

His early career, which was mostly on stage, was -- like the careers of so many of his generation -- interrupted by World War II. In 1943 he joined in the U.S. Army Air Forces, the same branch in which Peter Graves served.

Forsythe had one son during a three-year marriage to Parker MacCormack, his first wife. He had two daughters with his second wife, Julie Warren, whom he married in 1943; she passed away in 1994. Forsythe married Nicole Carter in 2002. He has six grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. 

He was nominated four times for the Emmy and six times for the Golden Globe Award, and took home two of the latter. He also has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

RIP, John Forsythe. 

-- Christie D'Zurilla

Photo: "Dynasty" actor John Forsythe on Jan. 30, 1983, after accepting the Golden Globe Award for best actor in a dramatic television series. Credit: Associated Press.

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