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The Morning Fix: Chase Carey chases the cash! Charlie Sheen's PR push. Hollywood's China problem.

March 22, 2011 |  7:17 am

After the coffee. Before learning how life will torture me today.

The Skinny: Charlie Sheen just won't go quietly, will he? I'm sure there is a pay-per-view special in the works too. In Tuesday's collection, we have a piece on the unassuming but all powerful News Corp. President Chase Carey. A look at the piracy situation in China. And finally, a new spat between Fox News and Glenn Beck.

Chasing the cash. News Corp. President and Chief Operating Officer Chase Carey is talking tough when it comes to getting cash for the media giant's content. Since coming back to work for Rupert Murdoch almost two years ago, Carey has been busy trying to reinvent the business model for the entertainment industry and so far he is succeeding. A look at what Carey's up to and how he got to occupy the seat next to Murdoch from the Los Angeles Times.

Charlie Sheen is crazy like a fox. Whatever else you think about Charlie Sheen, you have to hand it to him. Turns out there is a method to his madness and rants. The coverage on Sheen is no longer all about his substance issues, womanizing and violent past but rather what will he do next and his fight against "Two and a Half Men" co-creator Chuck Lorre and Warner Bros., which produces the hit for CBS. Much is being made about Sheen having a meeting at Fox but really, who wouldn't take a meeting with Sheen if for no other reason than to come home from work and say, "Hey honey, guess who I had a meeting with today?"  When he popped up on "Jimmy Kimmel" on Monday night, the crowd reacted as if he'd just saved the world from impending doom. All this for abusing drugs and losing his job. Radar Online and TMZ -- the mouthpieces for all things Sheen and Vulture on what it all means.

Land of the pirates. "Legal DVDs are like democracy — they don't exist in China," says Zhou Xin while looking at pirated copies of "Black Swan" and "The Social Network" in a store in Bejing. To say piracy is an issue with China is an understatement. Even China's own media reported that the country's pirate DVD industry made $6 billion last year while China's box-office receipts were just $1.5 billion. The Los Angeles Times looks at Hollywood's China problem.

WGA deal is mixed bag. The Writers Guild of America struck a new deal with Hollywood studios on Sunday. The good news is that the negotiations were relatively peaceful. The bad news is the writers didn't exactly get everything they were looking for in the contract. There are pension increases, but no pay increase for broadcast TV or a much-sought bump in cable residuals. More analysis from Variety.

No love lost between Fox News and Glenn Beck. Further proof of a battle between Fox News and Glenn Beck emerged Monday. It started when Mediaite reported that Joel Cheatwood, a Fox News senior vice president, would be leaving to start working at Beck's production company. Industry website Deadline Hollywood followed that with a story that Cheatwood wasn't leaving so much as not having his contract renewed by Fox News. The industry site even published what it said was Cheatwood's salary ($700,000 a year). I have a solution. Fox News cuts Beck and he teams up with Katie Couric for a he-said, she-said, daytime talker. It'd be huge!

Hands off my spectrum! Federal Communications Commission Chairman Julius Genachowski wants more spectrum for mobile technology. Broadcasters don't want to have their spectrum taken from them and now are making their case to the FCC that they don't like the way the agency is handling the issue. More from Broadcasting & Cable.

The A to Z of David Kelley. With a surprise hit in NBC's "Harry's Law" and one of the network's most anticipated pilots in "Wonder Woman," 2011 has been something of a comeback for legendary TV producer David E. Kelley. Vulture's Joe Adalian chats with Kelley about his career ups and downs and what's on the horizon. Lets hope there's no dancing babies in "Wonder Woman."

Inside the Los Angeles Times: Should Hollywood offer different prices for different movies? Institutional Shareholder Services is questioning Disney's decision to recommend reelecting ailing Apple chief Steve Jobs to its board of directors.

-- Joe Flint

Follow me on Twitter. You'll feel better. Twitter.com/JBFlint

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