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Monster Mash: 'King's Speech' on Broadway; Ai Weiwei tweets again

August 8, 2011 |  7:30 am

The King's Speech


Cashing in: "The King's Speech" -- the play from which the Oscar-winning movie was developed -- appears to be headed for Broadway in the fall of 2012. (Showbiz 411)

Busy fingers: Artist Ai Weiwei has returned to Twitter for the first time since being released by Chinese officials in June. (BBC News)

Popular: The 25th-anniversary touring production of "Les Miserables" has broken records at the Ahmanson Theatre. (Los Angeles Times)

Public art: A group of artists is working to build the world's largest working clock to go on display at the Burning Man Festival this month. (Sacramento Bee)

Circular: Richard Serra's "Sequence" sculpture gets a new home in Stanford University after leaving L.A. (San Francisco Chronicle)

Listen in: Audio of the New York Philharmonic's June performance of "The Cunning Little Vixen" by Czech composer Leos Janacek is online. (NPR)

Alois and Klara: An online auctioneer is hoping to sell portraits of Adolf Hitler's parents. (Art Info)

Money trouble: The Edgar Allan Poe home and museum in Baltimore is in danger of shutting down due to a lack of funds. (New York Times)

Blanche: Nicole Ari Parker has been cast alongside Blair Underwood in the upcoming Broadway revival of Tennessee Williams' "A Streetcar Named Desire." (Playbill)

Back from the dead?: The bankrupt Syracuse Symphony could see another life thanks to plans by Syracuse University. (Syracuse Post-Standard)

Hardly masterpieces: Affordable art is becoming more readily available to consumers. (Los Angeles Times)

Also in the L.A. Times: Charles McNulty reviews "Hairspray" at the Hollywood Bowl; Father Gregory Boyle, founder of Homeboy Industries, is preparing a stage version of his 2010 memoirs for this week's Ojai Playwrights Conference.

-- David Ng

Photo: Geoffrey Rush and Helena Bonham Carter flank Colin Firth in "The King's Speech." Credit: Weinstein Company

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