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NEA looking for artist to design 'Art Works' logo

February 1, 2010 | 11:44 am

Main_aw At the very least, Rocco Landesman will be able to say that he created one arts-related job during his tenure as the head of the National Endowment for the Arts.

The NEA announced Monday that it is accepting proposals from artists and designers to create the agency's "Art Works" logo. Landesman introduced the slogan earlier in his term to help emphasize the positive impact artists have on the economy.

"'Art Works' is a reminder that arts workers are real workers who are part of this country’s real economy," said the NEA in its request for proposals. 

"They earn salaries, support families, pay taxes.  Artists are also entrepreneurs and placemakers, who revitalize towns, cities and neighborhoods – both the economies and the ethos of them."

The NEA said the selected logo may be used in print and online and may accompany the existing NEA logo or even replace that logo.

The deadline for submitting proposals is Feb. 26 at 5 p.m., EST.

-- David Ng

Credit: NEA


 
Comments () | Archives (13)

"Accepting proposals" seems to be the NEA secret code word for speculative ("spec") work in the search for a designer to create the 'Art Works' logo. It's ironic that Rocco Landesman and his NEA are promoting an initiative to remind the public of the value/economic impact of artists by asking creative individuals to submit two possible designs, with no compensation, for the CHANCE of receiving the $25,ooo contract to complete the job. The old "give us your ideas for free and we might select you to be paid" spiel doesn't seem to convey much value in the talent, energy, time and intellectual property of a design professional. The NEA, and designers considering participation in this "contest," might want to take a look at the NO!SPEC movement. (http://no-spec.com)

Anyone wishing to design this logo for the NEA needs to read the RFP carefully. On page 22 it clearly states that those wishing to be considered must submit two images (logo designs) and a narrative explaining how the images embody the meanings of "Art Works".

This clearly falls under the definition of speculation—or spec—work. Spec work is the practice of soliciting work and only paying for the work if it is approved and used. Essentially, the "client" is asking a professional to work for free and, in this case the NEA is asking a large group to use their time, effort and talent for very little chance of any compensation. This is a practice which is frowned upon by professionals in the design community and the largest graphic design associations such as AIGA and the Graphic Arts Guild. You can also read more about spec work at www.no-spec.com

The NEA needs to rethink this, consult with some professionals in the design world and change how it goes about the business of getting its' logo.

This isn't private enterprise attempting to make money off a logo. It's the government which GIVES away money, and needs to save as much of that limited resrouce as it can. No paying millions for a new NBC logo. Thats absurd.


Anything will do, some better than others is all. Just do it. How's that for a logo, swooosh!

Everyone is using desperate artists like this these days . All contests are pyramid scams at there base core. I can't imagine why they can just hire someone to do it. It shows a fundamental misunderstanding of their own goals to support the artist by cheating them. A prime example that they don't know what they want in the origination from top to bottom. My I suggest a childish scrawl on cardboard like most of the art that wows the arts world.

That is great, now i am waiting for the best design results.

Designers who fear spec work are the average ones. I welcome spec work because I know I will win it-I'm that good. If you're a designer by trade, I understand your scepticism. If you're a true designer-one who takes it to an artform-you know you will win.

"They earn salaries, support families, pay taxes. Artists are also entrepreneurs and placemakers, who revitalize towns, cities and neighborhoods – both the economies and the ethos of them."

Logo design is a sophisticated and complex process. The hardest thing to do is to come up with the concept behind the logo.
The basis of many logo designs and graphics are simple geometric shapes - lines, circles, squares, and triangles.

This isn't private enterprise attempting to make money off a logo. It's the government which GIVES away money, and needs to save as much of that limited resrouce as it can. No paying millions for a new NBC logo. Thats absurd.

very nice work

QH Logo Design Guru - Custom logo Design Company

I would hope that you will post each and every one of the submissions so that the merits of the design solutions and level of quality can be judged. I would take a wild guess that you have to sort through an awful lot of sub par work to get a few logos that are not cringe-worthy or embarrassing for the NEA.

They earn salaries, support families, pay taxes. Artists are also entrepreneurs and placemakers, who revitalize towns, cities and neighborhoods – both the economies and the ethos of them.

"Designers who fear spec work are the average ones. I welcome spec work because I know I will win it-I'm that good. If you're a designer by trade, I understand your scepticism. If you're a true designer-one who takes it to an artform-you know you will win."

Anyone that espouses that world view clearly does not understand basic, long accepted, good business practices or the math involved in the lottery.

Designers, like doctors, lawyers, plumbers, etc., have only so much productive time in their creative wagon. Just how much can we afford to give away before we're selling from an empty wagon? Works for hot dog vendors, push chart owners and graphic artist.

The issue was settled several millennia ago: For the scripture said, You shall not muzzle the ox that
treads out the corn. And, The laborer is worthy of his wages."
The issue was settled several millennia ago: For the scripture said, You shall not muzzle the ox that
treads out the corn. And, The laborer is worthy of his wages."


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