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Jeremy Piven's fish tale is all wet, says National Fisheries Industry

January 16, 2009 | 10:11 am

Not surprisingly, the National Fisheries Institute, a nonprofit trade group that represents the seafood industry, found some of the statistics offered by former "Speed-the-Plow" actor Jeremy Piven to be a bit, well, fishy.

The folks at NFI offered their response to Piven's claims on their own YouTube video (above). They also challenged some of the information presented in the segment's summary by "Good Morning America's" Diane Sawyer.

On Tuesday, William H. Macy  ("Fargo") took over the role of Hollywood agent Bobby Gould in David Mamet's play, replacing Norbert Leo Butz, who stepped in to the role after Piven abruptly stepped out last month. Barring any run-ins with mercury, Macy, a veteran of multiple Mamet plays, will close out the limited engagement run on Feb. 22.

-- Lisa Fung


 
Comments () | Archives (3)

Piven is lying.

Jeez Masherpotato, lucky the whole world doesn't write people off so easily....

Of course the National Fisheries Industry have a problem with this - they make their money out of selling fish - they also support removing Federal advisories for pregnant woman and children warning them against eating 4 types of fish due to mercury levels - that shows you what their priority is - certaintly not public health at the expense of profits. Here is a great calculator for prediciting possible mercury exposure to help you choose the right fish. People worried about mercury ingestion from fish can estimate exposure by entering their weight, fish choice and serving size into the new gotmercury.mobi calculator for cell phone browsers. It’s based on current U. S. EPA and FDA guidelines, weak as they are. Learn more about mercury-laden fish at http://www.gotmercury.org or http://www.diagnosismercury.org


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