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New York's soda limits could boost similar efforts in California

September 17, 2012 |  9:01 am

California health advocates hope their state will see some movement on limiting sugar-laced soda following action last week to cap serving sizes for sugary drinks in New York CityCalifornia health advocates hope their state will see some movement on limiting sugar-laced soda following action last week to cap serving sizes for sugary drinks in New York City.

Starting in March, New York's restaurants, food trucks and concession stands will be banned from selling sugary sodas in containers larger than 16 ounces. The change was the idea of Mayor Michael Bloomberg, who thinks it will help reduce obesity and related health problems.

The move could assist advocates who want to change laws in California, according to Dr. Harold Goldstein, executive director of the nonprofit California Center for Public Health Advocacy.

"There is a growing movement throughout the state and the nation for cities to enact policies to help residents make better-informed beverage choices," Goldstein said. "This decision builds momentum in two California cities, Richmond and El Monte, which have put soda tax measures on the ballot this November."

A 2006 study released by the center estimated the cost to California for problems related to obesity and physical inactivity to be $ 41.2 billion annually, Goldstein said.

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-- Patrick McGreevy in Sacramento

Photo: A customer eats a meal with 21-ounce cups of soda at a Manhattan McDonald's last week. Credit: Mario Tama / Getty Images

 

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