Awards Tracker

All things Oscars, Emmys, Grammys and Tonys

Category: Anne Hathaway

Anne Hathaway on hosting the Oscars again: 'Why not? I don't know. Maybe. Perhaps. No.'

Anne Hathaway Oscars news"The critics were tough," Anne Hathaway admitted to Matt Lauer on the "Today Show." "They said we were the worst show ever. I think that qualifies as tough."

The interview marked the first time that the star spoke publicly about co-hosting the Oscar ceremony with James Franco.

"I think about the Oscars as several different experiences," she added. "There was the critical reaction, which was awful. Then there are the people who have been coming up to me since then who stop and say, 'I thought it was fantastic. I watched it with my family and we were entertained.' I am very grateful to those people.

"And then there's my memory of it, which is -- whether it was great or whether it stunk -- who knows? I still got to walk out on the Kodak [stage] and see those people and someday I'll get to tell my grandkids about it."

When Lauer asked her if she'd ever consider hosting the Oscars again, she replied, "Why not? I don't know. Maybe. Perhaps. No."

-- Tom O'Neil

Visit msnbc.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy

Photo: James Franco and Anne Hathaway at the Oscars. Photo credit: Mark J. Terrill / Associated Press.


Memo to Bruce Vilanch: Don't blame James Franco for your Oscar flop

TO:     Bruce Vilanch

FROM: Tom O'Neil

RE:     The gall you have blaming James Franco for your Oscar bomb

Vilanch 2011 I think it's shocking that you're blaming James Franco for your recent Oscar disaster. The problem with the ceremony wasn't that Franco wasn't available to attend more rehearsals or because the gig was outside his comfort zone, as you told Vulture. It was because you and your team wrote a lousy show.

Why is everybody beating up on James Franco and Anne Hathaway? They're just actors who had nothing to do with compiling the content of the Oscarcast. They just spoke the words written by you and your cohorts who penned  unfunny, unremarkable lines this year. How much better would the show have been if Franco had been available to attend more rehearsals or appeared more at ease on stage? Would it really have been wonderful if a different star uttered that ho-hum stuff you wrote? Do you really think Bette Midler could've gotten a laugh out of it? If so, that's REALLY funny.

Now why don't you wake up at last and go write a (funny) apology Tweet to @JamesFranco?

RELATED:

Poll: Who should host the next Oscars? Will Smith? Justin Bieber?

Reviews: Oscars show was the 'worst ever' -- and, oh, yes, 'marvelous' too

Oscar writer Bruce Vilanch speaks out on James Franco's (lack of) hosting skills

— Tom O'Neil

Photo credit: Photo of Bruce Vilanch by Jason Kempin / Getty Images.


Poll: Who should host the next Oscars? Will Smith? Justin Bieber?

Oscars shoulder shot

Now that the Oscars are over, the post-mortems are written and sourpusses have crucified the last telecast's hosts, it's time to start asking: who should be the next lamb to the slaughter the next host?

Should Anne Hathaway and James Franco be welcomed back to try, try again? What about recruiting one of the tried-and-true Oscar hosts? Recently, on "The View," Whoopi Goldberg revealed that the academy has asked her to return in recent years, but she said she would only do so if Billy Crystal agreed to co-host. He didn't. In fact, Crystal has made it clear that he doesn't want the job solo either, but we're putting him on our list anyway. Goldberg too.

Hey, since Oscarland is the last province on Earth not yet conquered by Justin Bieber, should it just be surrendered to the Bieb? Personally, I'm rooting for Will Smith, but I think he's too smart to step up.

RELATED LINKS:

Poll: Were James Franco and Anne Hathaway the worst Oscars hosts?

Poll: What was the worst part of the Oscars telecast?

Poll: What did you think of the Oscars show?

— Tom O'Neil

Photo: Los Angeles Times


Oscars poll: James Franco and Anne Hathaway were the worst hosts

James Franco Anne Hathaway Oscars Academy Awards news

James Franco and Anne Hathaway weren't merely lousy Oscars hosts — they were the worst in the last 20 years, according to the results of an online poll conducted by the Los Angeles Times' Awards Tracker blog at The Envelope.

That's quite a distinction, considering they beat two past hosts who are widely regarded as the worst in the history of the Academy Awards: David Letterman and Chris Rock. More bad news: Franco and Hathaway received nearly as many votes in the poll as Letterman and Rock combined. 

After 1,543 votes were tallied by Tuesday afternoon, James Franco and Anne Hathaway scored 42.45% (655 votes), followed by David Letterman 22.16% (342 votes), Chris Rock 20.8% (321 votes), Jon Stewart 7.71% (119 votes), Steve Martin and Alec Baldwin 4.02% (62 votes) and Hugh Jackman 2.85% (44 votes). The poll remains open, receiving votes here.

RELATED LINKS:

Reviews: Oscars show was the 'worst ever' -- and, oh, yes, 'marvelous' too

Poll: What was the worst part of the Oscars telecast?

Poll: What did you think of the Oscars show?

— Tom O'Neil 

Photo: James Franco and Anne Hathaway at the Oscars. Photo credit: Mark J. Terrill / Associated Press.


Oscars reactions: 'What a shame, Academy!'

Now that the critics have growled what they thought of the Oscars ceremony, let's hear from the real experts: The Envelope's readers. Below are sample comments culled from a 40-page thread in our forums full of views they expressed throughout the telecast. See more here.

Our posters have such fierce opinions about film awards that they just bestowed their own, which differ significantly from the Oscars. Their choices: "The Social Network" and David Fincher for best picture and director. See more here, including a curious tie for supporting actress.

Oscars Academy Awards Melissa Leo news

Jesse: It was like watching a show that Max Bialystock and Leo Bloom would have produced had they wanted people to actually like it. With the reverse effect in this case. Springtime for Oscar.

cRISS808: Dropping F-bombs at the Oscars? This ain't the MTV Movie Awards.

pacinofan: James Franco would rather get back to his novel or grade some papers.

BriGuy: I think Anne Hathaway's career will really take a hit after this.

Blacktie: What is with Jude Law's Tweety Bird hair?

TWC: Does Celine Dion age?

clementine: That Natalie Portman win washed the bad taste of Tom Hooper's win right out of my mouth.

NW Music Guy: We will remember "The Social Network" years from now, and "The King's...what?" What a shame, Academy.

Atypical: Having Bertie's entire speech dominate over the best picture montage like that? That was tacky, Academy.

ETHELCHARLES: Kirk Douglas gave some needed energy to kick things off nicely

TWC: I hated Melissa Leo's speech. She's turned into a crazy lady and the F-Bomb, while providing probably the only water-cooler moment of the night, was a little much. I cringed when she looked up into the rafters and said, "Wow, there are people up there too!" I hated her speech from start to finish. They should have started playing the music, like they did during some of the heartfelt speeches.

east/west: The only good thing about the show was the stage. Gorgeous setup.

Continue reading »

Poll: What was the best part of the Oscars telecast?

Billy crstyal oscars

Never mind, for just one moment, all the griping about the Oscar telecast. Yes, there were some disappointments — and we asked you to vote for the worst one here. Now we ask you to vote on the best.

There were lots of ceremony highlights over 3 hours and 15 minutes. That "Inception" montage at the beginning was a real winner. Songs sung by Celine Dion ("Smile") and Anne Hathaway ("Les Miserables") made us smile. Plus more. What was your favorite?

— Tom O'Neil

RELATED LINKS:

Reviews: Oscars show was the 'worst ever' -- and, oh, yes, 'marvelous' too

Oscars ceremony was one of the shortest in recent times

Poll: What was the worst part of the Oscars telecast?

Poll: What did you think of the Oscars show?

Red carpet photos

Oscar scorecard

Complete coverage: The Oscars

Photo: Billy Crystal at the Oscars. Credit: Liz O. Baylen / Los Angeles Times


Poll: What was the worst part of the Oscars telecast?

Oscars judge law robert downey jr Let's face it. There were lots of horrendous moments in the Oscars telecast. How dare the producers cut the Billy Crystal-Bob Hope segment so short to allow more time for what followed next: that witless, cringe-inducing, never-ending "banter" between Robert Downey Jr. and Jude Law.

Am I the only one outraged that producers ran audio from "The King's Speech" over video of all other nine films when introducing the nominees for best picture? How insulting! It hadn't even won yet. Couldn't they have waited a few minutes before rubbing it in?

Some people may think Melissa Leo's F-bomb was cool, but my view is this: If they're dropped in a clever way, fine. If not, they're a pathetic ploy for attention.

Many other scenes from the Oscarcast can be judged both ways. What about James Franco in drag? Some viewers may have enjoyed the long, gushing and fawning intros of nominees for lead actor and actress given by last year's winners, Jeff Bridges and Sandra Bullock. They made my teeth ache.


Photo: Robert Downey Jr., left, and Jude Law. Credit: Kevin Winter / Getty Images.


RELATED LINKS:

Reviews: Oscars show was the 'worst ever' -- and, oh, yes, 'marvelous' too

Oscars ceremony was one of the shortest in recent times

Poll: What did you think of the Oscars show?

Red carpet photos

Oscar scorecard

Complete coverage: The Oscars

— Tom O'Neil

 


Oscars: Behind the scenes on the opening film montage

Oscar co-hosts Anne Hathaway and James Franco kicked things off in high syle at the Oscar ceremony on Sunday with a movie montage that used "Inception" as a framework to edit the duo into scenes from some of the best picture nominees, including "The Social Network" and "True Grit."

Director Troy Miller has been making these opening montages for the Oscars since Billy Crystal killed with his when he hosted in 1997. This year marked Miller's sixth such film for the academy (he did them previously for the MTV Movie Awards). The director talked to us about his secrets for putting these short films together and why "127 Hours" wasn't in the mix.

Where do you watch your film during the show? Out with the audience?

I was in the house. Up, house left listening to it. It’s this thing where you want it to be great for the Oscar audience as well as the home audience. You have to check the stereo mix that projects in the house as well as the 5.1 mix that goes home, the color quality. You get so close to it that when you hear laughs you remember, “Oh yeah, it’s a comedy!”

It was surprising that “127 Hours” wasn’t in the montage. Was it ever part of it?

It was part of it and I kind of regret that we didn’t do it. Because it’s such a great movie and James was in it. Besides the logical joke of being stuck under a rock, I think it just got away from us with all the other films. In the opening “Inception” gag with the explosions, we had a lot of really funny jokes and set pieces that could have gone in there, but with timing, there were a lot of films we couldn’t cover, like “Toy Story 3” and “Winter’s Bone” and other things that were in early drafts.

Continue reading »

Poll: What did you think of the Oscars telecast?

In general, opinion of the Oscars telecast is that it was poor. Yes, it received a few raves (Entertainment Weekly), but it was also blasted as a "bomb" (Hollywood Reporter). (Read a full roundup here.) Maybe the truth is somewhere in between?

Oscars dragPersonally, I thought it was a smartly stylized show with lots of wonderful moments -- like James Franco and Anne Hathaway's "Inception" opener and Celine Dion's understated crooning of "Smile" during the "In Memoriam" tribute. I even liked the kids singing "Over the Rainbow" when the show was over because the segment  was given a big, dramatic payoff. The kids represented Everyboy and Everygirl who suddenly got a shot at performing at the Super Bowl of Showbiz. When they were joined at the end of the song by Oscar winners clutching their gold statuettes as they descended a staircase, that scene reminded everyone of just how far  amateur aspirations can carry you.

But the ceremony was plagued by missed opportunities. Why wasn't Anne Hathaway given a big musical number? Instead, she performed a bit from "Les Miserables" -- superbly -- then was cut off. Sure, it was funny when James Franco came out in drag, but the joke had no punch line. Worst of all: A segment pooling the input of two of the greatest Oscar hosts in history -- Bob Hope and Billy Crystal -- fell flat because it wasn't given time to fly. All night while watching the show, I kept getting the sense that producers Don Mischer and Bruce Cohen were hovering over everyone on stage with stopwatches and vaudeville hooks, too obsessed with trimming the show. (It ended up being one of the shortest in recent history.) They ended up cutting out its heart.

Now tell us what you think. Vote in our poll and contribute your thoughts by clicking on "Comments" above.

RELATED:

Red carpet photos

Oscar scorecard

Complete coverage: The Oscars

-- Tom O'Neil

Photo: Mark J. Terrill / Associated Press


Reviews: Oscars show was the 'worst ever' -- and, oh, yes, 'marvelous' too

Oscars reviews

Here's a sampling of some opinions of Sunday's Oscars telecast: 

ROGER EBERT: "The worst Oscarcast I've seen, and I go back awhile. Some great winners, a nice distribution of awards, but the show? Dead. In. The. Water."

WHOOPI GOLDBERG: The star who hosted the Oscars four times in the past said on "The View" this morning: "I felt like last night there was no one in charge …. I understand what they were trying to do. There are enough young performers out there who could have filled in the gaps. I like James Franco a lot. I like Anne Hathaway a lot. But this is a show that, it's on you to keep it going. It's on you. You have to be able to surf in this show. And I didn't think they surfed as much as they could have."

LOS ANGELES TIMES: "They played it safe, and who could blame them? …. [It was a] show that moved along, with a few draggy bits and high notes, like precisely what it was: a very long and fancy awards show."

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY: "Funny, poised, relaxed, and smart, Anne Hathaway and James Franco made for marvelous Oscar hosts. Their combination of respect and informality struck the right tone for the night, a happily surprising production that had its share of fine moments both planned and ad-libbed."

HOLLYWOOD REPORTER: "In what could go down as one of the worst Oscar telecasts in history, a bad and risky idea -- letting two actors host -- played out in spectacularly unwatchable fashion on the biggest of all nights for the film world …. James Franco had no business agreeing to host the Oscars, and his resulting pratfall in front of -- what, a billion people? -- must have made David Letterman gleeful, as his stint will no longer be pointed out as some kind of nadir. Anne Hathaway at least tried to sing and dance and preen along to the goings on, but Franco seemed distant, uninterested and content to keep his Cheshire-cat-meets-smug smile on display throughout."

AWARDS DAILY: "I heard a lot of grumblings that no one liked the 83rd Oscar telecast.  See, I come from a different perspective on that.  I actually like it when it’s bad. I like it when it chunders on and on and lasts all night. I like it when they accept that they will never be cool and just embrace their uncoolness."

RELATED:

Red carpet photos

Oscar scorecard

Complete coverage: The Oscars

-- Tom O'Neil

Photo: Mark J. Terrill. Credit: Associated Press



Connect

Recommended on Facebook


Advertisement

In Case You Missed It...

Stay Connected:




Recent Posts

Categories


Archives