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Nymphenburg Porcelain launches a delicate-but-edgy jewelry collection

Nymph Nymphenburg Porcelain, the iconic porcelain factory in Munich, is dipping its fabled feet into jewelry.

Designed by Swiss jeweler Patrik Muff, the 18-piece “Essentials” jewelry collection features gothic-tinged pendants and medallions made from Nympehnburg’s signature white porcelain.

Owned by the Wittelsbachs, the Bavarian royal family, the 248-year-old company has a patented clay recipe for its snow-white porcelain, known as “white gold.” And the new jewelry collection borrows designs from House of Wittelsbach's circa-18th century archives.

All Nymphenburg porcelain is produced by hand at the company's workshop. The clay is stored in a cellar to age for two years before being shaped on a wheel. And -- get this -- an old watermill at Nymphenburg creates the energy for the workshop. What, no Hobbits meandering about?
 
Rehashed Nympehnburg designs include the skull by Franz Ignaz Gunther from 1756 (now we know where Alexander McQueen found inspiration for his skulls?), angel wings and 3-D crosses set in gold and silver combined with rubies and diamonds.

Prices per piece range from around $350 to $8,000. The Essentials collections is sold in Los Angeles exclusively at antiques shop JF Chen, which hosted a party in celebration of the launch on Dec. 10 – luring Cheryl Tiegs, Jacqueline Bisset and Peggy Moffitt, among others.

-- Emili Vesilind

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Photo: Pieces from the Essentials collection. Credit: Nymphenburg Porcelain

 
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